Berlin Diary by William L. Shirer
The Journal of a Foreign Correspondent 1934-1949

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Synopsis

A radio broadcaster and journalist for Edward R. Murrow at CBS, William Shirer was new to the world of broadcast journalism when he began keeping a diary while in Europe during the 1930s. It was in 1940, still a virtual unknown, that Shirer wondered whether his reminiscences of the collapse of the world around Nazi Germany could be of any interest or value as a book.

Shirer's Berlin Diary, which is considered the first full record of what was happening in Germany during the rise of the Third Reich, first appeared in 1941. The book was an instant success. But how did Shirer get such a valuable firsthand account? He had anonymous sources willing to speak with him, provided their identity remained protected and disguised so as to avoid retaliation from the Gestapo. Shirer recorded his and others' eyewitness views to the horror that Hitler was inflicting on his people in his effort to conquer Europe. Shirer continued his job as a foreign correspondent and radio reporter for CBS until Nazi press censors made it virtually impossible for him to do his job with any real accuracy. He left Europe, taking with him the invaluable, unforgettable (and horrific) contents of his Berlin Diary.

Berlin Diary brings the reader as close as any reporter has ever been to Hitler and the rise of the Third Reich. Shirer's honest, lucid and passionate reporting of the brutality with which Hitler came to power and the immediate reactions of those who witnessed these events is for all time.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

William Shirer (1904-1993) was originally a foreign correspondent for the Chicago Tribune and was the first journalist hired by Edward R. Murrow for what would become a team of journalists for CBS radio. Shirer distinguished himself and quickly became known for his broadcasts from Berlin during the rise of the Nazi dictatorship through the first year of World War II. Shirer was the first of "Edward R. Murrow's Boys" - broadcast journalists - who provided news coverage during World War II and afterward. It was Shirer who broadcast the first uncensored eyewitness account of the annexation of Austria. Shirer is best known for his books The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich which won the National Book Award and Berlin Diary.
 

About William L. Shirer

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William Lawrence Shirer (February 23, 1904 - December 28, 1993) was an American journalist, war correspondent, and historian, who wrote The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, a history of Nazi Germany that has been read by many and cited in scholarly works for more than 50 years. Shirer was born in Chicago and graduated from Coe. Originally a foreign correspondent for the Chicago Tribune and the International News Service, Shirer was the first reporter hired by Edward R. Murrow for what would become a CBS radio team of journalists, and he became known for his broadcasts from Berlin, from the rise of the Nazi dictatorship through the first year of World War II (1940). With Murrow, he organized the first broadcast world news roundup, a format still followed by news broadcasts. Shirer wrote more than a dozen books including Berlin Diary (published in 1941); The Collapse of the Third Republic (1969) and a three-volume autobiography, Twentieth Century Journey (1976 to 1990). Shirer received a 1946 Peabody Award for Outstanding Reporting and Interpretation of News for his work at CBS. His book, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, won the 1961 National Book Award for Nonfiction and Carey-Thomas Award for non-fiction.
 
Published October 23, 2011 by RosettaBooks. 627 pages
Genres: History, War, Travel, Literature & Fiction, Biographies & Memoirs, Education & Reference, Political & Social Sciences, Computers & Technology, Humor & Entertainment. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Berlin Diary

Kirkus Reviews

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Here's the answer to those who have wondered whether Shirer's veiled allusions on the air, speaking from Berlin, have cloaked pro-Nazi sympathies.

May 23 2012 | Read Full Review of Berlin Diary: The Journal of ...

World War II Database

Full Title: Berlin Diary: The Journal of a Foreign Correspondent, 1934-1941.

Dec 25 2012 | Read Full Review of Berlin Diary: The Journal of ...

Defense Media Network

On July 30, 1941, with the Soviet Union now a member nation in the Allied camp following Germany’s invasion in Operation Barbarossa, the Sikorski government signed an agreement with the Soviet Union that guaranteed the release of Poles who had been incarcerated by the Soviet Union.

Apr 30 2013 | Read Full Review of Berlin Diary: The Journal of ...

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