Between the Assassinations by Aravind Adiga

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 9 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

Welcome to Kittur, India. It's on India's southwestern coast, bounded by the Arabian Sea to the west and the Kaliamma River to the south and east. It's blessed with rich soil and scenic beauty, and it's been around for centuries. Of its 193,432 residents, only 89 declare themselves to be without religion or caste. And if the characters in Between the Assassinations are any indication, Kittur is an extraordinary crossroads of the brightest minds and the poorest morals, the up-and-coming and the downtrodden, and the poets and the prophets of an India that modern literature has rarely addressed.

A twelve-year-old boy named Ziauddin, a gofer at a tea shop near the railway station, is enticed into wrongdoing because a fair-skinned stranger treats him with dignity and warmth. George D'Souza, a mosquito-repellent sprayer, elevates himself to gardener and then chauffeur to the lovely, young Mrs. Gomes, and then loses it all when he attempts to be something more. A little girl's first act of love for her father is to beg on the street for money to support his drug habit. A factory owner is forced to choose between buying into underworld economics and blinding his staff or closing up shop. A privileged schoolboy, using his own ties to the Kittur underworld, sets off an explosive in a Jesuit-school classroom in protest against casteism. A childless couple takes refuge in a rapidly diminishing forest on the outskirts of town, feeding a group of "intimates" who visit only to mock them. And the loneliest member of the Marxist-Maoist Party of India falls in love with the one young woman, in the poorest part of town, whom he cannot afford to wed.

Between the Assassinations showcases the most beloved aspects of Adiga's writing to brilliant effect: the class struggle rendered personal; the fury of the underdog and the fire of the iconoclast; and the prodigiously ambitious narrative talent that has earned Adiga acclaim around the world and comparisons to Gogol, Ellison, Kipling, and Palahniuk. In the words of The Guardian (London), "Between the Assassinations shows that Adiga...is one of the most important voices to emerge from India in recent years."

A blinding, brilliant, and brave mosaic of Indian life as it is lived in a place called Kittur, Between the Assassinations, with all the humor, sympathy, and unflinching candor of The White Tiger, enlarges our understanding of the world we live in today.
 

About Aravind Adiga

See more books from this Author
Aravind Adiga was born in India in 1974 and raised partly in Australia. He attended Columbia and Oxford Universities. A former correspondent for Time magazine, he has also been published in the Financial Times. He lives in Mumbai, India. British narrator John Lee has read audiobooks in almost every conceivable genre, from Charles Dickens to Patrick O'Brian, and from the very real life of Napoleon to the entirely imagined lives of sorcerers and swashbucklers. He has won numerous Audie Awards and AudioFile Earphones Awards, and he was named a Golden Voice by AudioFile in 2009. Lee is also an accomplished stage actor and wrote and coproduced the feature films Breathing Hard and Forfeit.
 
Published May 21, 2009 by Free Press. 353 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Between the Assassinations

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

The architecture of the book – its title, a detailed chronology – suggests this timing is crucial, but the substance of it – apparently chaotic local events framed by singular lives – go to prove what seems to be Adiga's point, that major historical shifts are only faintly legible in the close-up...

Jul 18 2009 | Read Full Review of Between the Assassinations

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

In one of the stories in Between the Assassinations, Aravind Adiga's collection written in parallel with his Booker-winning The White Tiger, Murali, a young communist and short-story writer, is told by his editor: "There is talent in your writing.

Jul 10 2009 | Read Full Review of Between the Assassinations

BC Books

See more reviews from this publication

A remarkably well developed picture of life in a specific city and a number of the people who live in it.

Jun 08 2009 | Read Full Review of Between the Assassinations

BC Books

See more reviews from this publication

Mann Booker Prize winner uses short sketches to examine the years of "squandered idealism and hope."

Jun 22 2009 | Read Full Review of Between the Assassinations

BC Books

See more reviews from this publication

While some areas of the city might take a full day to explore, others take only part of a day, thus some chapters cover a full day and others only a morning or an afternoon.

Jun 08 2009 | Read Full Review of Between the Assassinations

BC Books

See more reviews from this publication

In fact, many of the characters in this story would be largely invisible in the course of the city's everyday life - the young Muslim who comes from his village and gains work as a gofer in a tea shop, a youth from another village who arrives on the bus and rises to the level of a tram conductor ...

Jun 23 2009 | Read Full Review of Between the Assassinations

The Telegraph

About halfway through Between the Assassinations a rickshaw-puller, overcome by exhaustion and humiliation, stops his cart in the middle of the road, shakes his fist at the passing traffic with impotent fury and shouts: 'Don’t you see something is wrong here?’ Aravind Adiga’s new collect...

Jul 05 2009 | Read Full Review of Between the Assassinations

The Telegraph

Adiga has a neat economy of expression, used to convey a wealth of realistic detail, all the way down to “the clarity of the stencilling on an advertisement, the glowing spokes of the bicycle wheel ridden by the man delivering newspapers”.

Jul 10 2009 | Read Full Review of Between the Assassinations

The Bookbag

Summary: Set in the fictional South Indian town of Kittur, Man Booker-winning author Avarind Adiga presents a collection of twelve short stories exploring familiar themes of caste, religion, poverty, class and political corruption.

Apr 12 2010 | Read Full Review of Between the Assassinations

Reader Rating for Between the Assassinations
72%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 77 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×