Bread and Roses, Too by Katherine Paterson

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2013 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award

Rosa’s mother is singing again, for the first time since Papa died in an accident in the mills. But instead of filling their cramped tenement apartment with Italian lullabies, Mamma is out on the streets singing union songs, and Rosa is terrified that her mother and older sister, Anna, are endangering their lives by marching against the corrupt mill owners. After all, didn’t Miss Finch tell the class that the strikers are nothing but rabble-rousers—an uneducated, violent mob? Suppose Mamma and Anna are jailed or, worse, killed? What will happen to Rosa and little Ricci? When Rosa is sent to Vermont with other children to live with strangers until the strike is over, she fears she will never see her family again. Then, on the train, a boy begs her to pretend that he is her brother. Alone and far from home, she agrees to protect him . . . even though she suspects that he is hiding some terrible secret. From a beloved, award-winning author, here is a moving story based on real events surrounding an infamous 1912 strike.

About Katherine Paterson

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Katherine Paterson was born in China, where she spent part of her childhood. After her education in China and the American South, she spent four years in Japan, the setting for her first three novels. Ms. Paterson has received numerous awards for her writing, including National Book Awards for The Master Puppeteer and The Great Gilly Hopkins, as well as Newbery Medals for Jacob Have I Loved and Bridge to Terabithia. Ms. Paterson lives with her husband in Vermont. They have four grown children.
Published August 12, 2008 by Clarion Books. 289 pages
Genres: Children's Books, Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference. Fiction

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Known as the Bread and Roses strike, the 1912 mill workers’ protest against working conditions in the mills of Lawrence, Mass., is the historical context for Paterson’s latest work, a beautifully written novel that puts a human face on history.

Sep 04 2006 | Read Full Review of Bread and Roses, Too

Publishers Weekly

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Returning to themes she explored in Lyddie , Paterson sets this novel in the winter of 1912 in Lawrence, Mass., where the plight of textile mill workers unfolds through the alternating third-person perspectives of a boy millworker, Jake Beale, and Rosa Serutti, whose mother and sister work in the...

Jul 17 2006 | Read Full Review of Bread and Roses, Too

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