Broken Angels by Richard K. Morgan

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Synopsis

Welcome back to the brash, brutal new world of the twenty-fifth century: where global politics isn’t just for planet Earth anymore; and where death is just a break in the action, thanks to the techno-miracle that can preserve human consciousness and download it into one new body after another.

Cynical, quick-on-the-trigger Takeshi Kovacs, the ex-U.N. envoy turned private eye, has changed careers, and bodies, once more . . . trading sleuthing for soldiering as a warrior-for-hire, and helping a far-flung planet’s government put down a bloody revolution.

But when it comes to taking sides, the only one Kovacs is ever really on is his own. So when a rogue pilot and a sleazy corporate fat cat offer him a lucrative role in a treacherous treasure hunt, he’s only too happy to go AWOL with a band of resurrected soldiers of fortune. All that stands between them and the ancient alien spacecraft they mean to salvage are a massacred city bathed in deadly radiation, unleashed nanotechnolgy with a million ways to kill, and whatever surprises the highly advanced Martian race may have in store. But armed with his genetically engineered instincts, and his trusty twin Kalashnikovs, Takeshi is ready to take on anything—and let the devil take whoever’s left behind.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Richard K. Morgan

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Richard K. Morgan is the acclaimed author of Woken Furies, Market Forces, Broken Angels, and Altered Carbon, a New York Times Notable Book that also won the Philip K. Dick Award. Morgan sold the movie rights for Altered Carbon to Joel Silver and Warner Bros. His third book, Market Forces, has also been sold to Warner Bros. He lives in Scotland. "From the Hardcover edition.
 
Published March 2, 2004 by Del Rey. 544 pages
Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Action & Adventure, Literature & Fiction, War, Business & Economics. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Broken Angels

Kirkus Reviews

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It’s not quite so easy in actuality, of course, what with all the corporate espionage going on and a senseless war raging, but Kovacs (a killing machine who’s sick to death of death, though he can’t deny his knack for it) will likely manage.

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The Guardian

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but somehow the suspicion persists that Broken Angels is fundamentally about fighting for money and power, where Altered Carbon seemed to be about fighting against them.

Apr 12 2003 | Read Full Review of Broken Angels

Publishers Weekly

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The few people Kovacs gets close to are the team that accompanies him on an expedition to claim the ultimate Martian relic—a functioning FTL starship.

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Entertainment Weekly

Originally posted Apr 23, 2004 Published in issue #761 Apr 23, 2004 Order article reprints

Apr 23 2004 | Read Full Review of Broken Angels

SF Site

(Again, Franklin's War Stars provides an excellent history of this phenomenon, from the Gatling gun to the atom bomb to space missile defense.) While certain, shall we say, less mature readers may find the story the next best thing to a movie in terms of spectacular shoot-outs and special effec...

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Bookmarks Magazine

Morgan’s debut novel, Altered Carbon, imagined a 25th-century future where mortals could achieve immortality by digitizing human consciousness in cortical stacks and then downloading it in a new body.

Oct 24 2009 | Read Full Review of Broken Angels

The Zone

Many planets are scattered with the remains of 'Martian' civilisation - buildings, carvings, even some useable technology - but the artefact uncovered here is unlike anything mankind has ever seen.

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Reader Rating for Broken Angels
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