Buckley by Jr. William F. Buckley
The Right Word: About the Uses and Abuses of Language, including Vocabu lary;: Usage; Style & Speaking; Fiction, Diction & Dictionaries; Reviews & Interviews; a Lexicon...

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Synopsis

The book his readers have asked for--on the uses and abuses of language, vocabulary, diction and dictionaries, journals and journalists, style, eloquence, interviews and reviews--Buckley: The Right Word includes interviews with Charlie Rose and The Paris Review, verbal encounters with Borges, le Carre, Galbraith, Schlesinger, Playboy, Cosmopolitan, The New York Times, essays on formality and style--even a Buckley lexicon. Online promo.
 

About Jr. William F. Buckley

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Editor and writer William F. Buckley, Jr. was born in New York City on November 24, 1925. While at Yale University, he studied political science, history and economics and graduated with honors. In 1955, he founded the weekly journal National Review where he was editor in chief. He began his syndicated newspaper column in 1962 and his weekly television discussion program, Firing Line was syndicated in 1966. Buckley wrote "God and Man at Yale" (1951) which was an indictment of liberal education in the United States, "Up from Liberalism" (1959), "The Unmaking of a Mayor" (1966), which tells of his unsuccessful mayoral campaign as the Conservative Party candidate for New York City in 1965, and "Quotations from Chairman Bill" (1970). Buckley also wrote best selling stories of international intrigue whose titles include "Saving the Queen" (1976), "Stained Glass" (1978), "Who's on First" (1980), "Marco Polo, If You Can" (1981), and "See You Later, Alligator" (1985). He died on February 27, 2008.
 
Published December 3, 1996 by Random House. 524 pages
Genres: Education & Reference. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Buckley

The New York Times

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Last fall, when he declared his support for Barack Obama, Christopher Buckley was more or less excommunicated from the pages of National Review, the magazine founded by his father, William F.

May 01 2009 | Read Full Review of Buckley: The Right Word: Abou...

The New York Times

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Bingo. Again. “Boomsday” is one of Christopher Buckley’s fizziest satires.

Mar 19 2007 | Read Full Review of Buckley: The Right Word: Abou...

The New York Times

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President Vanderdamp has a Supreme Court seat to fill, and in a stroke of genius, he has nominated America’s most popular TV judge: Pepper Cartwright, star of “Courtroom Six.” Skip to next paragraph Joe Ciardiello Christopher Buckley 'Supreme Courtship,' by Christopher ...

Sep 05 2008 | Read Full Review of Buckley: The Right Word: Abou...

The New York Times

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This novel’s main har-har involves the way Bird and Angel elevate a minor news report about the Dalai Lama into American suspicions that the Chinese are trying to kill the man Bird calls “a 75-year-old sweetie pie with glasses, plus the sandals and the saffron robe and the hugging and the mandala...

Apr 30 2012 | Read Full Review of Buckley: The Right Word: Abou...

The New York Times

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If anyone could be said to specialize in the political equivalent of a root canal, it’s his minister of state security and minister of national defense, who will soon be drawn into a potentially catastrophic rivalry not only with President Fa but with their opposite numbers across the Pacific, th...

May 11 2012 | Read Full Review of Buckley: The Right Word: Abou...

The New York Times

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Bogus declares that “without Buckley and National Review, Reagan’s election would not have been possible.” But this was a hollow victory, according to Bogus, since the right-wing ideology that Buckley brought to power betrayed what was best in the American conservative tradition as embod...

Dec 09 2011 | Read Full Review of Buckley: The Right Word: Abou...

The Washington Times

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and the rise of American conservatism is not only interesting but also relevant to our present moment.” And indeed, Mr. Bogus rises to the occasion, crafting a formative biography and history that is not only interesting and relevant, but an essential study of Buckley and the post-World War II co...

Dec 20 2011 | Read Full Review of Buckley: The Right Word: Abou...

USA Today

(Buckley depicts the secretive workings of the Chinese Politburo with humor and insight.)As usual, Buckley ties up all his loose ends in a clever conclusion and leaves the satisfied reader amused and informed about Tibet, China, media manipulation, and the weird workings of our own government.

May 02 2012 | Read Full Review of Buckley: The Right Word: Abou...

The Boston Globe

In the past 50 years, only a handful of songs have attained truly iconic status and become cultural touchstones that transcend artist, genre, and even language.

Dec 24 2012 | Read Full Review of Buckley: The Right Word: Abou...

The Daily Beast

I seem to have picked an apt title for my Daily Beast column, or blog, or whatever it’s called: “ What Fresh Hell.” My last posting (if that’s what it’s called) in which I endorsed Obama, has brought about a very heaping helping of fresh hell.

Oct 14 2008 | Read Full Review of Buckley: The Right Word: Abou...

National Review Online

We’ve got a few copies left of Happy Days Were Here Again, Reflections of a Libertarian Journalist — the hard-to-find collection of Bill Buckley’s columns from 1985 to 1993.

May 03 2012 | Read Full Review of Buckley: The Right Word: Abou...

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