Cable Visions by Sarah Banet-Weiser

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Synopsis

Cable television, on the brink of a boom in the 1970s, promised audiences a new media frontier-an expansive new variety of entertainment and information choices. Music video, 24–hour news, 24-hour weather, movie channels, children's channels, home shopping, and channels targeting groups based on demographic characteristics or interests were introduced. Cable Visions looks beyond broadcasting's mainstream, toward cable's alternatives, to critically consider the capacity of commercial media to serve the public interest. It offers an overview of the industry's history and regulatory trends, case studies of key cable newcomers aimed at niche markets (including Nickelodeon, BET, and HBO Latino), and analyses of programming forms introduced by cable TV (such as nature, cooking, sports, and history channels).
 

About Sarah Banet-Weiser

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Sarah Banet-Weiser is associate professor at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California, and author of The Most Beautiful Girl in the World: Beauty Pageants and National Identity and Kids Rule!: Nickelodeon and Consumer Citizenship.Cynthia Chris is assistant professor of media culture at the City University of New York's College of Staten Island, and author of Watching Wildlife. Anthony Freitas works as a media relations consultant for non-profit organizations in San Francisco. Cynthia Chris is assistant professor of media culture at the City University of New York's College of Staten Island, and author of Watching Wildlife. Anthony Freitas works as a media relations consultant for non-profit organizations in San Francisco. Anthony Freitas works as a media relations consultant for non-profit organizations in San Francisco.
 
Published September 1, 2007 by NYU Press academic. 384 pages
Genres: Humor & Entertainment, Professional & Technical, Political & Social Sciences, Arts & Photography. Non-fiction

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