Camino Island by John Grisham
A Novel

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 4 Critic Reviews

How all these little threads join up is a pleasure for Grisham fans to behold: there’s nothing particularly surprising about it, but he’s a skillful spinner of mayhem and payback.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “A delightfully lighthearted caper . . . [a] fast-moving, entertaining tale.”—Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

A gang of thieves stage a daring heist from a vault deep below Princeton University’s Firestone Library. Their loot is priceless, impossible to resist.
        
Bruce Cable owns a popular bookstore in the sleepy resort town of Santa Rosa on Camino Island in Florida. He makes his real money, though, as a prominent dealer in rare books. Very few people know that he occasionally dabbles in unsavory ventures.
     
Mercer Mann is a young novelist with a severe case of writer’s block who has recently been laid off from her teaching position. She is approached by an elegant, mysterious woman working for an even more mysterious company. A generous monetary offer convinces Mercer to go undercover and infiltrate Cable’s circle of literary friends, to get close to the ringleader, to discover his secrets.

But soon Mercer learns far too much, and there’s trouble in paradise—as only John Grisham can deliver it.

Praise for Camino Island

“A happy lark [that] provides the pleasure of a leisurely jaunt periodically jolted into high gear, just for the fun and speed of it.”—The New York Times Book Review

“Sheer catnip . . . [Grisham] reveals an amiable, sardonic edge here that makes Camino Island a most agreeable summer destination.”—USA Today

“Fans will thrill with the classic chase and satisfying ending; and book lovers will wallow in ecstasy.”—The Florida Times-Union
 

About John Grisham

See more books from this Author
Since first publishing A Time to Kill in 1988, Grisham has written one novel a year (his other books are The Firm, The Pelican Brief, The Client, The Chamber, The Rainmaker, The Runaway Jury, The Partner, The Street Lawyer, The Testament, The Brethren, A Painted House, Skipping Christmas, The Summons, The King of Torts, Bleachers, The Last Juror, and The Broker) and all of them have become international bestsellers. The Innocent Man (October 2006) marks his first foray into non-fiction. Grisham lives with his wife Renee and their two children Ty and Shea. The family splits their time between their Victorian home on a farm in Mississippi and a plantation near Charlottesville, VA.
 
Published June 6, 2017 by Dell. 304 pages
Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Crime, Literature & Fiction, Political & Social Sciences, Science Fiction & Fantasy. Fiction
Bestseller Status:
icon1
Peak Rank on Jul 23 2017
icon23
Weeks as Bestseller
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Camino Island
All: 4 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 2

Kirkus

Above average
on Jul 05 2017

How all these little threads join up is a pleasure for Grisham fans to behold: there’s nothing particularly surprising about it, but he’s a skillful spinner of mayhem and payback.

Read Full Review of Camino Island: A Novel | See more reviews from Kirkus

NY Journal of Books

Below average
Reviewed by Michael J. McCann on Jun 05 2017

Camino Island will find its audience, no doubt, but not necessarily the same audience that has cherished John Grisham’s legal thrillers in the past. Nor will it stand the test of time.

Read Full Review of Camino Island: A Novel | See more reviews from NY Journal of Books

Star Tribune

Good
Reviewed by Jeff Strickler on Jun 09 2017

...this book’s slower pacing and introspective nature. But at the same time, those fans might be impressed to discover that an author who churns out books as if they were coming off an assembly line clearly has spent considerable time analyzing the craft of writing and the artists who practice it.

Read Full Review of Camino Island: A Novel | See more reviews from Star Tribune

NY Times

Above average
Reviewed by Ken Tucker on Jun 12 2017

There are also repetitions: In these pages we encounter “seasoned thieves” and a “seasoned raconteur,” and find Cable described as a “seasoned professional” when it comes to sex. That’s a lot of seasoning. Yet these flaws don’t impede the jolly appeal of the novel’s storytelling.

Read Full Review of Camino Island: A Novel | See more reviews from NY Times

Reader Rating for Camino Island
73%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 9000 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×