Casey at the Bat by Ernest L. Thayer
A Ballad of the Republic Sung in the Year 1888 (Caldecott Honor Book)

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Synopsis

"And somewhere men are laughing, and somewhere children shout; But there is no joy in Mudville-mighty Casey has struck out." Those lines have echoed through the decades, the final stanza of a poem published pseudonymously in the June 3, 1888, issue of the San Francisco Examiner. Its author would rather have seen it forgotten. Instead, Ernest Thayer's poem has taken a well-deserved place as an enduring icon of Americana. Christopher Bing's magnificent version of this immortal ballad of the flailing 19th-century baseball star is rendered as though it had been newly discovered in a hundred-year-old scrapbook. Bing seamlessly weaves real and trompe l'oeil reproductions of artifacts-period baseball cards, tickets, advertisements, and a host of other memorabilia into the narrative to present a rich and multifaceted panorama of a bygone era. A book to be pored over by children, treasured by aficionados of the sport-and given as a gift to all ages: a tragi-comic celebration of heroism and of a golden era of sport.
 

About Ernest L. Thayer

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Christopher Bing, whose first book, "Casey at the Bat," was named a 2001 Caldecott Honor Book, lives with his wife and three children in Lexington, Massachusetts, in a house directly on the Freedom Trail, the route on which Paul Revere rod
 
Published October 1, 2000 by Chronicle Books. 32 pages
Genres: Sports & Outdoors, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

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For those who have forgotten this grade-school staple which first appeared in the San Francisco Examiner in 1888, here are some early couplets which epitomize the style: ""A straggling few got up to go in deep despair.

Jun 30 1978 | Read Full Review of Casey at the Bat: A Ballad of...

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When he learned that Wallack’s Theater was hosting a “Baseball Night” to take advantage of local enthusiasm for the first-place New York Giants, Gunter presented the clipping to Wallack’s manager, who promptly passed it on to his star, DeWolf Hopper.

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Of the making of Caseys there seems no end, but here the illustrator of John Lithgow’s Remarkable Farkle McBride (2000) delivers the chestnut with such broad, satirical panache that only the dourest of spoilsports will be able to resist going along for the ride.

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.” But the outlook for the possibilities of digitally manipulated design in children’s books looks increasingly brilliant as evidenced by this rather amazing version of Thayer’s well-loved baseball poem, “Casey at the Bat.” In Bing’s debut, he has created a delightful oversized scrapbook version ...

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Publishers Weekly

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Borrowing the cadences of Ernest Thayer's classic “Casey at the Bat,” this hockey tale by newcomer Sederman also sets up a suspenseful end-of-game scenario.

Oct 20 2008 | Read Full Review of Casey at the Bat: A Ballad of...

Publishers Weekly

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With a few brief strokes of his brush, Fitzgerald captures an era-a hat of a certain style, a pair of glasses, the cut of a suit-and his light-dappled acrylics seem aged by a fine patina.

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Publishers Weekly

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For an ingenious take on Casey's approach to his at-bat ("Then from 5,000 throats and more there rose a lusty yell;/ It rumbled through the valley, it rattled in the dell"), Payne shows a spread of Mudville, and a farmer and his son listening to the uproar from where they are working on the mount...

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Publishers Weekly

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Full-color currency, for instance, accompanies ""They thought if only Casey could but get a whack at thatD/ We'd put up even money now with Casey at the bat,"" while an ad for Brown's Bronchial Troches appears with the couplet ""Then from 5,000 throats and more there rose a lusty yell;/ It rumble...

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KidsReads

The famous poem about an exciting baseball game in Mudville first appeared in the newspaper The San Francisco Examiner in 1888.

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