Change They Can't Believe In by Christopher S. Parker & Matt A. Barreto
The Tea Party and Reactionary Politics in America

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 2 Critic Reviews

...this study will appeal to campus progressives eager to cast this movement in the most chilling, unflattering light.
-Publishers Weekly

Synopsis

Are Tea Party supporters merely a group of conservative citizens concerned about government spending? Or are they racists who refuse to accept Barack Obama as their president because he’s not white? Change They Can’t Believe In offers an alternative argument—that the Tea Party is driven by the reemergence of a reactionary movement in American politics that is fueled by a fear that America has changed for the worse. Providing a range of original evidence and rich portraits of party sympathizers as well as activists, Christopher Parker and Matt Barreto show that the perception that America is in danger directly informs how Tea Party supporters think and act.

In a new afterword, Parker and Barreto reflect on the Tea Party’s recent initiatives, including the 2013 government shutdown, and evaluate their prospects for the 2016 election.

 

About Christopher S. Parker & Matt A. Barreto

See more books from this Author
Christopher S. Parker is the Stuart A. Scheingold Professor of Social Justice and Political Science at the University of Washington, Seattle. He is the author of "Fighting for Democracy" (Princeton). Matt A. Barreto is associate professor of political science at the University of Washington, Seattle, and director of the Washington Institute for the Study of Ethnicity, Race and Sexuality. He is the author of "Ethnic Cues".
 
Published October 26, 2014 by Princeton University Press. 386 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences, Education & Reference. Non-fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Change They Can't Believe In
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

Publishers Weekly

Good
on Apr 22 2013

...this study will appeal to campus progressives eager to cast this movement in the most chilling, unflattering light.

Read Full Review of Change They Can't Believe In:... | See more reviews from Publishers Weekly

Kirkus

Above average
on Mar 28 2013

A dispassionate, academic account supported by reasoned facts in place of political passions.

Read Full Review of Change They Can't Believe In:... | See more reviews from Kirkus

Reader Rating for Change They Can't Believe In
55%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 42 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×