Chibi by Barbara Brenner
A True Story from Japan

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Synopsis

When Oka-san, a brown-and-gold duck, selects the Mitsui Office Park as the perfect spot for her nest, people flock from downtown Tokyo to watch the ducklings hatch. A modern-day Make Way for Ducklings, set in Japan.
 

About Barbara Brenner

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Barbara Brenner was born on June 26, 1925, in Brooklyn, New York. Brenner attended Seton Hall College and Rutgers University from 1942-46, while also working as a copy editor at Prudential Insurance Company. Her freelance work as an artist's agent prepared her for a literary life. In 1957 she published her first book, Somebody's Slippers, Somebody's Shoes. She followed this book with an educational picture book entitled Barto Takes the Subway, designed to improve reading comprehension and sight vocabulary. Her artistic development continued when she began to collaborate with her husband, illustrator Fred Brenner, on The Flying Patchwork Quilt. Her next book, On the Frontier with Mr. Audubon, was selected by School Library Journal as The Best of the Best among children's books published over 26 seasons. One of her bestselling titles was Wagon Wheels (published in 1978), which deals with the trials and tribulations of a close-knit African American family. In 1986, Brenner was honored with the Pennsylvania School Librarians' Association's Outstanding Pennsylvania Author Award. Brenner's most celebrated book is a collection entitled Voices: Poetry and Art from around the World, for which she was chief editor. This book received an ALA Notable Book for Children mention and an ALA Best Book for Young Adults award. No Bio No Bio
 
Published March 22, 1999 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 64 pages
Genres: Nature & Wildlife, Travel, Children's Books, Education & Reference, Science & Math, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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Otani's neatly drawn, evenly lit watercolors capture the tale's simple charm in clean, roomy scenes of smiling people in casual Western dress photographing--but never trying to feed or handle--the dappled, lively ducklings.

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Publishers Weekly

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This fact-based, Japanese descendant of Robert McCloskey's classic Make Way for Ducklings ""offers a welcome glimpse of bustling contemporary Tokyo,"" said PW.

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Publishers Weekly

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Here and in several subsequent spots, including scenes in which the matriarch and her brood march in single file along a sidewalk and waddle across a busy street with the help of a policeman, the narrative and Otani's passable watercolor-and-ink illustrations closely echo Robert McCloskey's class...

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