Children, Race, and Power by Gerald Markowitz
Kenneth and Mamie Clark's Northside Center

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Synopsis

Traces the influence of social scientists Kenneth and Mamie Clark on the civil rights movement, on child welfare, and on public policy in New York in the fifties and sixties, when they established Harlem's Northside Center. UP.
 

About Gerald Markowitz

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Gerald Markowitz is Professor of History at John Jay CollegeGerald Markowitz is Professor of History at John Jay College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. David Rosner is Professor of History and Public Health at C David Rosner is Professor of History and Public Health at Columbia University and Director of the Center for the Historolumbia University and Director of the Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health at Columbia's Mailman School oy and Ethics of Public Health at Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health. They are coauthors of "Children, Race, and f Public Health. They are coauthors of "Children, Race, and Power: Kenneth and Mamie Clark's Northside Center "(1996) anPower: Kenneth and Mamie Clark's Northside Center "(1996) and "Deadly Dust: Silicosis and the Politics of Occupational Dd "Deadly Dust: Silicosis and the Politics of Occupational Disease in Twentieth Century America "(1994). They are coeditisease in Twentieth Century America "(1994). They are coeditors of "Dying for Work: Safety and Health in the United Stators of "Dying for Work: Safety and Health in the United States "(1987) and "Slaves of the Depression: Workers' Letters aes "(1987) and "Slaves of the Depression: Workers' Letters about Life on the Job "(1987). bout Life on the Job "(1987). David Rosner is Professor of History and Public Health at Columbia University and Co-Director of the new Program in the History of Public Health and Medicine at Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health. He received his M.S. in Public Health from the University of Massachusetts and his doctorate from Harvard in the History of Science and, until recently, was the University Distinguished Professor of History at the City University of New York. In addition to numerous grants, he has been a Guggenheim Fellow, a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, and a Josiah Macy Fellow. He has been awarded the Distinguished Scholar's Prize from the City University and recently, the Viseltear Prize for Outstanding Work in the History of Public Health from the APHA. He is author of A Once Charitable Enterprise (Cambridge University Press, 1982; Princeton University Press, 1987), and editor of Archives of Sickness, Epidemics and Public Health in New York City (Rutgers University Press, 1995) and Health Care in America: essays in Social History (with Susan Reverby). In addition, he has co-authored and edited with Gerald Markowitz numerous books and articles, including Children, Race, and Power: Kenneth and Mamie Clark's Northside Center (1996), Deadly Dust: Silicosis and the Politics of Industrial Disease (1991), Dying for Work: Safety and Health in the United States(1987), and "Slaves of the Depression": Workers' Letters about life on the Job (1987). Currently, he and Gerald Markowitz are working on a book on the boundaries between occupational and environmental health for the University of California Press.
 
Published September 1, 1996 by University of Virginia Press. 304 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Education & Reference, History, Travel. Non-fiction

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An arresting study of the tumultuous history of Harlem's Northside Center for Child Development, its indomitable founders, and the community it serves.

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Project MUSE

This book about Harlem's Northside Center for Child Development provides a vivid account of the internal workings and the day-to-day life of the Center throughout its fifty-year history, 1946 to 1996.

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