Children of the Longhouse by Joseph Bruchac

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Synopsis

In this gripping novel set in a Mohawk village of the late 1400s, eleven-year-old twins are caught up against their will in a dangerous rivalry. Ohkwa'ri and his twin sister are among the most admired young people in their village. Yet an older boy named Grabber has no love for the twins--and he and his friends will surely try to harm Ohkwa'ri in the great lacrosse game coming up. The twins believe in the path of peace, but can peaceful ways prevail against Grabber and his gang? Full-color map.
 

About Joseph Bruchac

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Joseph Bruchac, coauthor of The Keepers of the Earth series, is a nationally acclaimed Native American storyteller and writer who has authored more than 70 books of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry for adults and children. He lives in upstate New York.
 
Published June 1, 1996 by Dial. 160 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Travel, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Children of the Longhouse

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A Native American man tells his nephew 10 legends of sacred places.

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More than a guide to places sacred to Native Americans, this reverent book prompts readers to look within themselves to find the hallowed ground that ""sets our sprits on the right path."" While visiting ancestral land, a Native American man shares with his nephew 10 legends of sacred places from...

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But growing up, his dark-skinned maternal grandfather denied his Indian blood, calling himself ""French-Canadian,"" and told young Joseph that he was a ""mongrel."" In a strained family situation that is never made completely clear (though descriptions of his father's short-fused temper and brusq...

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Following up on their How Chipmunk Got His Stripes, father-son team Joseph and James Bruchac and artists Jose Aruego and Ariane Dewey present the tale of how Turtle outsmarts Beaver, who refuses to share his pond with Turtle in Turtle's Race with Beaver: A Traditional Seneca Story.

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Father and son writing team Joseph and James Bruchac return with their third folktale, Raccoon's Last Race, illus.

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"Bruchac explores what it means to be Native American in a modern society through the perceptive first-person narrative of 11-year-old Chris Nicola," said PW.

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Not long after Molly's parents mysteriously disappear one night, her "great-uncle" shows up to claim her, with photographs of her family that convince the adults around her (but not Molly) that he is a relative.

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This legend explains the origins of strawberries, grown by the sun to help the first man and woman patch a quarrel.

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A terrible accident that costs Sonny's father part of his right hand, and a friendship with the town librarian, who shares the news that she lost her German Jewish parents in the Holocaust, reminds everyone to value what will always belong to them, namely, their identity.

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Opening with fast-paced sketches of a lacrosse game and punctuated by the reverent thoughts of a teenage Iroquois player, Bruchac's (Pocahontas, reviewed below) contemporary novel will draw in both sports enthusiasts and those with an interest in Native American culture.

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One chapter, about land transactions, makes clear to readers that such deals as Peter Minuit's ""purchase"" of Manhattan for 60 guilders of trade goods were inconceivable to Native peoples: they sold only the right to share the land, believing it ""could not be bought or sold any more than water,...

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