Churchill by Martin Gilbert
A Life

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Synopsis

First published in 1991, this is a story of adventure. The author uses Churchill's personal letters and the recollections of his contemporaries, friends and enemies, to go behind the scenes of some of the stormiest and fascinating political events of our time revealing his qualities in peace and war, not least as an orator and a man of vision.
 

About Martin Gilbert

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Martin Gilbert, 1936 - Martin Gilbert was born in London in 1936 to a jeweler. He was sent to Canada at the age of 3 and a half in an effort to escape the war, but was returned home soon thereafter. He attended Highgate School from 1945 til 1954. Gilbert then joined the British Army for a few years, and went on to Magdalen College at Oxford. He graduated from Oxford in 1960 and wrote his first book, called "The Appeasers." In 1961, after a year of research and writing, Gilbert was asked to join a team of researchers working for Winston Churchill. At the age of 25, he was formally inducted into the team, doing all of his own research. Gilbert became known as Churchill's official biographer and has remained so for thirty years. He is a fellow of Oxford College at Merton and has written over 40 books, some on Churchill, such as his multivolume treatise called "Churchill" as well as books on the Holocaust, "Surviving the Holocaust" and books on the war itself, "The Second World War." Long after Churchill died, Gilbert chronicled his efforts in the war and in making the world a better place for all her people to exist. He continues to write on the struggles of Jews during the war and the histories of this world, from culture to culture.
 
Published June 5, 2014 by RosettaBooks. 1077 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences, Travel, War, Arts & Photography. Non-fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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British historian and Churchill biographer Gilbert (Kristallnacht: Prelude to Destruction, 2006, etc.) explores the great statesman’s early, fervent support of Zionism and wartime pleas to save the Jews from Nazi persecution.

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Kirkus Reviews

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It thrilled Winston more to know that one of his ancestors was what he called, in the parlance of the time, “a Seneca squaw.” Writes Gilbert (The Righteous, 2003, etc.), “the quintessential Englishman was not only half American but also one-sixty-fourth Native American.” Being half American did n...

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Publishers Weekly

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Author of an eight-volume official biography of Winston Churchill, Gilbert here distills his vast knowledge into a lucid, comprehensive and authoritative life of the man considered by many to have bee

Oct 12 1992 | Read Full Review of Churchill: A Life

Publishers Weekly

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Following up his eight-volume official biography of Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965), Gilbert offers this 1000-page summary that is basically a distillation of all he has written about his subject up

Nov 04 1991 | Read Full Review of Churchill: A Life

The New York Times

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So, what we get in ''The Last Lion'' is a now-familiar montage of pictures: Churchill as the neglected son of a socialite mother and a syphilitic father, Churchill as an unhappy schoolboy at Harrow, Churchill in India and South Africa, Churchill in the House of Commons.

May 25 1983 | Read Full Review of Churchill: A Life

The Guardian

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So in the past few years we have had Churchill and Spain by Richard Wigg, Churchill and the Norway Campaign by Graham Rhys-Jones and Churchill and the Jews by Gilbert.

Nov 08 2008 | Read Full Review of Churchill: A Life

Publishers Weekly

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Author of an eight-volume official biography of Winston Churchill, Gilbert here distills his vast knowledge into a lucid, comprehensive and authoritative life of the man considered by many to have been the outstanding public figure of the 20th century.

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The Washington Times

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For example, on April 26, 1915, he wrote a touching obituary about the poet Rupert Brooke during his sojourn in the Liberal Party ranks: “Joyous, fearless, versatile, deeply instructed, with classic symmetry of mind and body, ruled by high undoubting purpose, he was all that one would wish Englan...

Jul 30 2012 | Read Full Review of Churchill: A Life

Post and Courier

Ponder the analogy he drew during a radio broadcast on Oct. 1, 1939, a mere four weeks before Britain declared war on Germany: “Of all the wars that men have fought in their hard pilgrimage, none was more noble than the great Civil War in America nearly 80 years ago.

Nov 11 2012 | Read Full Review of Churchill: A Life

The New York Review of Books

McCloy, then Roosevelt’s assistant secretary for war: “Suddenly,” McCloy later recalled, “he referred to the number of his early contemporaries who had been killed during what he called the hecatombs of World War I.” Churchill then described himself “as a sort of ‘sport’ in nature’s sense as he s...

May 07 1987 | Read Full Review of Churchill: A Life

The New York Review of Books

When I say that one is “left wondering if future historians may find more material in the private family papers” to illustrate “in three dimensions rather than two” the very special relationship between Churchill and Roosevelt, I am obviously thinking of the whole range of material often to be fo...

Sep 24 1987 | Read Full Review of Churchill: A Life

Project MUSE

The result not only portrays an imaginary lifelong romance between Churchill and the Jews, but also reflects a symbiosis between the author and the object of his admiration for over 40 years.6 In order to obtain a balanced view of Churchill’s complex relationship with the Jews, it is necessary ...

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London School of Economics

While in the United States he had purchased a large block of American shares (£20,000 worth) on the eve of “Black Thursday.” This gives us the launching point for the book, where we find Churchill at home on his fifty-fifth birthday (30th November 1929) in financial disarray and on the verge of a...

Jul 08 2012 | Read Full Review of Churchill: A Life

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