Churchill by Winston Churchill
The Power of Words

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 37 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

Winston Churchill knew the power of words. In public speeches and published books, in newspaper and magazine articles, he expressed his feelings and laid out his vision for the future. His wartime writings and speeches have fascinated generation after generation with their powerful narrative style and thoughtful reflection.

This book contains one hundred extracts from his books, articles and speeches. They range from his memories of his schooldays, to his contributions to the debates on social policy and on war, his contributions in both world wars to the events and discourse, and his efforts after 1945 to see the world a better place.

Martin Gilbert, Churchill's official biographer, has chosen passages that express to him the essence of Churchill's thoughts, and which describe—in his own inimitable words—the main adventures of his life, and the main crises of his career with Gilbert’s own introduction and interlinking text. They give, from first to last, an insight into his life and thought, how it evolved, and how he made his mark on the British and world stage.

 

 

About Winston Churchill

See more books from this Author
Martin Gilbert is Churchill's official biographer and one of Britain’s leading historians. He is the author of eighty-two books, including Churchill: A Life. He is an Honorary Fellow of Merton College, Oxford, and a Distinguished Fellow of Hillsdale College, Michigan. He lives in London.
 
Published June 5, 2012 by Da Capo Press. 536 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Travel, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Churchill

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

At last his unique qualities were brought to bear on a supreme challenge, and with his unshakable optimism, his heroic vision, and above all, his splendid speeches, Churchill roused the spirit of the British people.” Though her research obviously goes deep, a little of this breeziness goes a long...

| Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

“On 10 December 1954 a visitor from East Africa was waiting on a horsehair sofa in the hallway of 10 Downing Street.”

Aug 12 2010 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

From Roy Jenkins's masterly biography, we emerge marveling at the manifold gifts that informed Churchill's genius for leadership.

Nov 11 2001 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

Carlo D’Este makes the case for Winston Churchill as a military strategist.

Nov 09 2008 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

The American right is claiming Churchill as a founding father. But is there really a seamless continuum from Churchill to Reagan to Bush?

Feb 27 2005 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

In Churchill's Shadowby David Cannadine396pp, Allen Lane, £25.

Aug 16 2002 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

In 1938 it dawned on war planners that a single air raid could wipe out much of the British high command, so work began on what became the cabinet war rooms.

Jun 24 2011 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

According to Nicholas Rankin, however, the British developed a rare gift for it during the two world wars.

Oct 03 2008 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

Churchill Roy Jenkins 1,002pp, Macmillan, £30.

Oct 12 2001 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

But Holmes's fearsome condemnation of British political decay and paralysis between the wars suggests to me that the sickness really was terminal and that without Churchill the impact of Hitler would have been enough to bring the whole system to some unimaginable collapse.

Apr 23 2005 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

It was, in fact, shortly after the fall of France, the miracle of Dunkirk and the Battle of Britain, that young Jenkins was first introduced to Prime Minister Churchill by his father, the Labour MP Arthur Jenkins.

Oct 13 2001 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

BC Books

See more reviews from this publication

Father and son writing team Michael and Patrick McMenamin collaborate in The Parsifal Pursuit, a new approach to the genre of historical fiction.

Feb 13 2012 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

Book Reporter

Winston Churchill doesn't seem to be the sort of fellow who needs a new biography written about him.

Nov 15 2001 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The Washington Times

See more reviews from this publication

An alternative subtitle for Cita Stelzer’s delightful account of how Churchill’s gusto for food fueled not only his body and soul but also his policymaking might be “A Serious Account of a (Seemingly) Frivolous Subject.” For Churchill, satisfying food and a salubrious environment to enjoy it were...

Mar 19 2013 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The Washington Times

See more reviews from this publication

Churchill declared a policy to “set the people free” and dismantled the monstrous and disastrously inept edifice of rationing and socialism that the postwar Labor Party government - the most incompetent domestically in modern British history - had erected.

Dec 03 2010 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The Star

See more reviews from this publication

We hear that unique and stirring voice and recognize it as still part of our collective memory in Canada. With his words during World War 11, Winston Spencer Churchill lifted up a nation and all who fought with her. British psychiatrist Anthony Storr said that when France fell, Churchill became t...

Nov 09 2012 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The Independent

What is undoubtedly true, as Michael Shelden's welcome account of the early years of Churchill's career makes plain, is that he was someone of formidable talent, but was also in the early years naïve, impetuous and, that worst of political sins, unlucky.

Mar 16 2013 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The Telegraph

When, in 1918, Jennie Churchill married her third husband, the implausibly named Montagu Phippen Porch, she was 67, he 44 - three years younger than her son Winston.

Jan 03 2008 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The Telegraph

Yet Hastings even manages to make a virtue of the Western Allies’ initial lack of martial success in the first half of the war, arguing: ‘‘Had Britain – or America – produced legions of warriors such as those of wartime Germany and Japan, they would have ceased to be the liberal democrac...

Sep 03 2009 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The Telegraph

Churchill was so intensely frustrated by the caution and lack of imagination of his generals – notably those who had won VCs in the First World War – that he tried to fight his own war of commando raids, failing to get his way over landings in Norway, and getting it with disastrous effec...

Sep 13 2009 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

USA Today

Early on, he captures Churchill's flair for inspirational speech, as when the 26-year-old lecturer describes to a Canadian audience how he fled his Boer captors during the war, hiding out in a coal mine before navigating by night across Africa: "'The stars in their courses,' he said of his escape...

Mar 22 2013 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

Dallas News

In one paragraph, the historian summarizes the length, width and depth of his subject's career as a politician, warrior and artist: "In his ninety years, Churchill had spent fifty-five years as a member of Parliament, thirty-one years as a minister, and nearly nine years as prime minister.

Nov 22 2009 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

Express

... Each year sees the publication of more books about Churchill, often focusing on
a particular aspect of his life: as warrior, as war correspondent, ...

Aug 05 2011 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

Macleans

Winston Churchill’s 90-year life was so stuffed with adventures that Michael Shelden has the luxury to start in 1901, Churchill’s first year as a politician, and end in 1915, with his career in ruins.

Mar 28 2013 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

Seattle PI

Mr. Churchill's Secretary by Susan Elia MacNeal is an enjoyable historical fiction book taking place in the early days of World War II.

Oct 29 2012 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

London Review of Books

Bernard Porter says that Churchill believed he should have been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize rather than the Literature one, and that, not being able to attend the ceremony, he wrote a letter to the Nobel Prize committee with a barbed comment about Sweden's neutrality (LRB, 14 January).

| Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

Bookmarks Magazine

Between his rise and his fall, Churchill built a modern navy, experimented with radical social reforms, survived various threats on his life, made powerful enemies and a few good friends, annoyed and delighted two British monarchs, became a husband and father, took the measure of the German mi...

Mar 31 2013 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The New York Review of Books

He would not have hesitated to say it.” On the other hand, Lloyd George warmly approved someone’s description of Churchill as being “frank without being straight”—a remark which Lady Violet repeats with prim disapproval.

| Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The New York Review of Books

After the vast number of works on Churchill that have appeared in the last sixty-five years, one could be forgiven for thinking that everything significant must … Purchase a print subscription (20 issues per year) and also receive on...

Aug 19 2010 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The New York Review of Books

Churchill’s writings, Orwell observed, bestowing the most meaningful accolade he could manage, were “more like those of a human being than of a public figure.” Though in 1939 Orwell had been suspicious of Churchill’s belligerent rhetoric and ominous potential for a personality cult of his own, by...

Feb 28 2002 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The New York Review of Books

As The New York Times reported, “the question of whether Barack Obama or Mitt Romney will occupy the White House has been overshadowed at times by the question of whether Winston Churchill will do so.” According to some accounts, a bust of Churchill has been at the White House since the 1960s, bu...

Feb 07 2013 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

The New York Review of Books

Surely he knows, if he “struggled through” my single volume, that far from being mesmerized by admiration for Churchill I concluded that “this is how Churchill was seen by his contemporaries, not as a great man but as a flawed man whose defects of character and judgment were as alarming as his gi...

Oct 21 1982 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

CNN.com

"At seventy-thirty on a Sunday morning," Lawton writes, "London was a hive of activity, men in blue, men in khaki, backs bent to shovels and piles of debris, half in and half out of half-houses, twisting and wriggling through the ruins, seeking out the trapped, the living and the dying and the de...

Apr 26 2004 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

London School of Economics

Political journalists often refer to Leader of the Opposition as the hardest job in politics, but opposition studies have remained largely neglected by political academics.

Jun 24 2012 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

London School of Economics

He qualified her as the first Prime Minister in the history of UK membership to have given ‘at important moments Europe the loudest place on the agenda’ (p.306): the Bruges Speech, her mistrust of Germans and Germany, with a special dislike for Helmut Kohl and finally her losing the struggle (and...

Apr 21 2013 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

BBC History Magazine

Episodes for which Churchill was criticised – the Dardanelles, opposition to Indian home rule, the Abdication crisis, Singapore – have for him been misunderstood: Churchill was consistently well-intentioned, and his mistakes were remarkably few given his long public service.

| Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

truthdig

At one time or another, he stood for Parliament under six labels: Conservative, Liberal, Coalition, Constituents, Unionists and National Conservative.” Still, “If Churchill was ever anything, he was a Liberal (as well as a Seditionist and a small ‘c’ conservative.”) Certainly Churchill was no...

Jan 01 2010 | Read Full Review of Churchill: The Power of Words

Reader Rating for Churchill
87%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 30 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×