Circe by Madeline Miller

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A few passages coil toward melodrama, and one inelegant line after a rape seems jarringly modern, but the spell holds fast. Expect Miller’s readership to mushroom like one of Circe’s spells. Miller makes Homer pertinent to women facing 21st-century monsters.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

#1 New York Times Bestseller
" A bold and subversive retelling of the goddess's story, Circe manages to be both epic and intimate in its scope, recasting the most infamous female figure from the Odyssey as a hero in her own right." --- Alexandra Alter, New York Times
In the house of Helios, god of the sun and mightiest of the Titans, a daughter is born. But Circe is a strange child--not powerful, like her father, nor viciously alluring like her mother. Turning to the world of mortals for companionship, she discovers that she does possess power--the power of witchcraft, which can transform rivals into monsters and menace the gods themselves.

Threatened, Zeus banishes her to a deserted island, where she hones her occult craft, tames wild beasts and crosses paths with many of the most famous figures in all of mythology, including the Minotaur, Daedalus and his doomed son Icarus, the murderous Medea, and, of course, wily Odysseus.

But there is danger, too, for a woman who stands alone, and Circe unwittingly draws the wrath of both men and gods, ultimately finding herself pitted against one of the most terrifying and vengeful of the Olympians. To protect what she loves most, Circe must summon all her strength and choose, once and for all, whether she belongs with the gods she is born from, or the mortals she has come to love.

With unforgettably vivid characters, mesmerizing language and page-turning suspense, Circe is a triumph of storytelling, an intoxicating epic of family rivalry, palace intrigue, love and loss, as well as a celebration of indomitable female strength in a man's world.

 

About Madeline Miller

See more books from this Author
Madeline Miller grew up in Philadelphia, has a BA and MA from Brown University in Latin and Ancient Greek, and has been teaching both for the past nine years. She has also studied at the Yale School of Drama, specializing in adapting classical tales to a modern audience. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Song of Achilles is her first novel.
 
Published April 10, 2018 by Little, Brown and Company. 400 pages
Genres: History, Literature & Fiction, Science Fiction & Fantasy. Fiction
Bestseller Status:
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Peak Rank on Apr 29 2018
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Weeks as Bestseller
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Critic reviews for Circe
All: 5 | Positive: 4 | Negative: 1

Kirkus

Excellent
on Jan 23 2018

A few passages coil toward melodrama, and one inelegant line after a rape seems jarringly modern, but the spell holds fast. Expect Miller’s readership to mushroom like one of Circe’s spells. Miller makes Homer pertinent to women facing 21st-century monsters.

Read Full Review of Circe | See more reviews from Kirkus

Star Tribune

Good
Reviewed by Colleen Abel on Apr 13 2018

Through her elegant, psychologically acute prose, Miller gives us a rich female character who inhabits the spaces in between.

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NY Times

Above average
Reviewed by Claire Messud on May 28 2018

In spite of these occasional infelicities and awkwardnesses, “Circe” will surely delight readers new to the witch’s stories as it will many who remember her role in the Greek myths of their childhood: Like a good children’s book, it engrosses and races along at a clip...

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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Alex Preston on Apr 08 2018

If you read this book expecting a masterpiece to rival the originals, you’ll be disappointed; Circe is, instead, a romp, an airy delight, a novel to be gobbled greedily in a single sitting.

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NPR

Above average
Reviewed by Annalisa Quinn on Apr 11 2018

It's a small detail, but it's the difference between a person of independence and skill, and some male dream of danger, foreignness, and sex, lounging with parted lips while she watches the horizon for ships.

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Reader Rating for Circe
93%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 409 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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