Classified by Christopher Moran
Secrecy and the State in Modern Britain

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This is a well-researched and fascinating book, despite the blinkers. And it ends with a note of caution for those of us...who might otherwise naturally place ourselves on the "open government" rather than the "secret state" side of this argument.
-Guardian

Synopsis

Classified is a fascinating account of the British state's long obsession with secrecy and the ways it sought to prevent information about its secret activities from entering the public domain. Drawing on recently declassified documents, unpublished correspondence and exclusive interviews with key officials and journalists, Christopher Moran pays particular attention to the ways that the press and memoirs have been managed by politicians and spies. He argues that, by the 1960s, governments had become so concerned with their inability to keep secrets that they increasingly sought to offset damaging leaks with their own micro-managed publications. The book reveals new insights into seminal episodes in British post-war history, including the Suez crisis, the D-Notice Affair and the treachery of the Cambridge spies, identifying a new era of offensive information management, and putting the contemporary battle between secret-keepers, electronic media and digital whistle-blowers into long-term perspective.
 

About Christopher Moran

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Christopher Moran is a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the University of Warwick. His previous publications include Spooked: Britain, Empire and Intelligence (as co-editor, 2009).
 
Published December 13, 2012 by Cambridge University Press. 451 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences, Education & Reference, Travel. Non-fiction
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Guardian

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Reviewed by Bernard Porter on Jan 10 2013

This is a well-researched and fascinating book, despite the blinkers. And it ends with a note of caution for those of us...who might otherwise naturally place ourselves on the "open government" rather than the "secret state" side of this argument.

Read Full Review of Classified: Secrecy and the S... | See more reviews from Guardian

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