Climbing the Mountain by Kirk Douglas
My Search for Meaning

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With the simple power and astonishing candor that made his 1988 autobiography, The Ragman's Son, a number one international bestseller, Kirk Douglas now shares his quest for spirituality and Jewish identity -- and his heroic fight to overcome crippling injuries and a devastating stroke.
On February 13, 1991, at the age of seventy-four, Kirk Douglas, star of such major motion-picture classics as Champion, Spartacus, and Paths of Glory, was in a helicopter crash, in which two people died and he himself sustained severe back injuries. As he lay in the hospital recovering, he kept wondering: Why had two younger men died while he, who had already lived his life fully, survived?
The question drove this son of a Russian-Jewish ragman to a search for his roots and on a long journey of self-discovery -- a quest not only for the meaning of life and his own relationship with God, but for his own identity as a Jew. Through the study of the Bible, Kirk Douglas found a new spirituality and purpose. His newfound faith deeply enriched his relationship with his own children and taught him -- a man who had always been famously demanding and impatient -- to listen to others and, above all, to hear his own inner voice.
Told with warmth, wit, much humor, and deep passion, Climbing the Mountain is inspirational in the very best sense of the word.

About Kirk Douglas

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Kirk Douglas has been a Hollywood legend for more than half a century. His eighty-three films include The Bad and the Beautiful and Lust for Life. In addition, his company, Bryna, has produced such classics as Spartacus, Douglas has received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award given by the President, as well as numerous other awards and honors. Currently he serves as a Goodwill Ambassador for the State Department and the Legion de Honneur in France. The father of four sons, and grandfather of five, he lives with his wife, Anne, in Beverly Hills.
Published October 27, 2001 by Simon & Schuster. 272 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Health, Fitness & Dieting, Religion & Spirituality, Humor & Entertainment, Arts & Photography, Self Help, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction

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