Cocktails by D. A. Powell
Poems

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Synopsis

kids everywhere are called to supper: it's late
it's dark and you're all played out. you want to go home

no rule is left to this game. playmates scatter like
breaking glass
they return to smear the ______. and you're it
--from "[you'd want to go to the reunion: see]"

In Cocktails, D. A. Powell closes his contemporary Divine Comedy with poems of sharp wit and graceful eloquence born of the AIDS pandemic. These poems, both harrowing and beautiful, strive toward redemption and light within the transformative and often conflicting worlds of the cocktail lounge, the cinema, and the Gospels.
 

About D. A. Powell

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D. A. Powell is the author of Tea and Lunch. He is Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in Poetry at Harvard University.
 
Published March 1, 2004 by Graywolf Press. 72 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Cocktails

Publishers Weekly

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Powell's third, and best, book completes his much-talked-about trilogy about growing up gay and uneasy in the age of HIV—and about living with the virus himself.

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BC Books

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If cocktail bloggers were to emulate Julie Powell and her famous online journey through Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking, they could do much worse than working their way through Yuri Kato's Japanese Cocktails.

Mar 01 2010 | Read Full Review of Cocktails: Poems

Star Tribune

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In that spirit, the book's middle section threads through grief and regret, danger and longing so fluidly that Powell almost casts off the shadow of AIDS, but not quite.

Mar 06 2004 | Read Full Review of Cocktails: Poems

Seattle PI

If cocktail bloggers were to emulate Julie Powell and her famous online journey through Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking, they could do much worse than working their way through Yuri Kato's Japanese Cocktails.

Apr 26 2011 | Read Full Review of Cocktails: Poems

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