Cold, Cold Ground by Adrian McKinty

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There's food for thought in McKinty's writing, but he is careful not to lose the force of his narrative in introspection.
-Guardian

Synopsis

Spring 1981. Northern Ireland. Belfast on the verge of outright civil war. The Thatcher government has flooded the area with soldiers, but nightly there are riots, bombings, and sectarian attacks.

In the midst of the chaos, Sean Duffy, a young, witty, Catholic detective in the almost entirely Protestant Royal Ulster Constabulary, is trying to track down a serial killer who is targeting gay men. As a Catholic policeman, Duffy is suspected by both sides and there are layers of complications. For one thing, homosexuality is illegal in Northern Ireland in 1981. Then he discovers that one of the victims was involved in the IRA, but was last seen discussing business with someone from the Protestant UVF (Ulster Volunteer Force).

Fast-paced, evocative, and brutal, this book is a brilliant depiction of Belfast at the height of the Troubles and a cop caught in the cross fire.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Adrian McKinty

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Adrian McKinty is the author of seven crime novels, including Dead I Well May Be (shortlisted for the Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award), Fifty Grand (the 2010 Spinetingler Award winner), and Falling Glass, and, most recently, The Cold Cold Ground. Born and raised in Carrickfergus, Northern Ireland, McKinty was called "the best of the new generation of Irish crime novelists" in the Glasgow Herald.














Author Residence: Melbourne, Australia














Author Hometown: Carrickfergus, Northern Ireland
 
Published November 13, 2012 by Seventh Street Books. 322 pages
Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Literature & Fiction, History, Crime. Fiction
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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Eoin McNamee on Jan 06 2012

There's food for thought in McKinty's writing, but he is careful not to lose the force of his narrative in introspection.

Read Full Review of Cold, Cold Ground | See more reviews from Guardian

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