Color Me English by Caryl Phillips
Thoughts About Migrations and Belonging Before and After 9/11

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Synopsis

The bestselling author Caryl Phillips has for years written about and explored the experience of migration through his spellbinding and award-winning novels, plays, and essays. In this fascinating collection he looks at the notion of belonging prior to and following 9/11, beginning with a reflection on his own experience as one of the only black boys in his school in the UK alongside his first interaction with a British Muslim boy who joined the school.

Phillips turns to his years of living and teaching in the United States—including a riveting chronicle of the day the two towers fell—as well as historical and literary reflections with James Baldwin, Richard Wright, and other writers who grappled with notions of migration and belonging in their own day.
 

About Caryl Phillips

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Caryl Phillips lives in New York City.From the Trade Paperback edition.
 
Published July 19, 2011 by The New Press. 354 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Political & Social Sciences, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

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The four essays in “Homeland Security,” written between 2001 and 2006, show Phillips’ disappointment over the failure of America to live up to its image as a land of freedom and equality, but also his hope that storytelling will restore the spirit of the country.

Apr 05 2011 | Read Full Review of Color Me English: Thoughts Ab...

Washington Independent Review of Books

Whether the topic is the tragic life and artistic triumph of Harlem Renaissance writer Claude McKay, the story of the real writer of the lyrics of the iconic song “Strange Fruit” (it wasn’t Billie Holliday) or a profile of a Ghanaian taxi driver who wants Phillips to help him leave his country, P...

Jul 27 2011 | Read Full Review of Color Me English: Thoughts Ab...

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