Committed by Elizabeth Gilbert
A Love Story

69%

14 Critic Reviews

The problem is that this is a first-person account and the subject is love, and her life. She tells readers that she loves Felipe, but nowhere does she show a truly unique, poignant moment.
-LA Times

Synopsis

Look out for Elizabeth Gilbert’s new book, Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear, on sale now!


At the end of her bestselling memoir Eat, Pray, Love, Elizabeth Gilbert fell in love with Felipe, a Brazilian-born man of Australian citizenship who'd been living in Indonesia when they met. Resettling in America, the couple swore eternal fidelity to each other, but also swore to never, ever, under any circumstances get legally married. (Both were survivors of previous bad divorces. Enough said.) But providence intervened one day in the form of the United States government, which-after unexpectedly detaining Felipe at an American border crossing-gave the couple a choice: they could either get married, or Felipe would never be allowed to enter the country again. Having been effectively sentenced to wed, Gilbert tackled her fears of marriage by delving into this topic completely, trying with all her might to discover through historical research, interviews, and much personal reflection what this stubbornly enduring old institution actually is. Told with Gilbert's trademark wit, intelligence and compassion, Committed attempts to "turn on all the lights" when it comes to matrimony, frankly examining questions of compatibility, infatuation, fidelity, family tradition, social expectations, divorce risks and humbling responsibilities. Gilbert's memoir is ultimately a clear-eyed celebration of love with all the complexity and consequence that real love, in the real world, actually entails.


From the Hardcover edition.
 

About Elizabeth Gilbert

See more books from this Author
Elizabeth Gilbert is an award-winning writer of both fiction and nonfiction. Her short story collection, Pilgrims, was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award, and her novel, Stern Men, was a New York Times Notable Book. Her 2002 book, The Last American Man, was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. She is best known for her 2006 memoir, Eat, Pray, Love, which has been published in more than thirty languages; a film based on the memoir, starring Julia Roberts, opened in August 2010. Her most recent book, the memoir Committed: A Love Story, appeared in 2010. In 2008, Time magazine named Gilbert one of the most influential people in the world. Her Web site is www.elizabethgilbert.com.
 
Published December 17, 2009 by Riverhead Books. 305 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Health, Fitness & Dieting, Parenting & Relationships, Self Help, Romance. Non-fiction
Bestseller Status:
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Peak Rank on Feb 20 2011
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Critic reviews for Committed
All: 14 | Positive: 9 | Negative: 5

Kirkus

Above average

A vaguely depressing account of how intimate relationships are complicated by marriage, divorce and expectations about both. Given Gilbert’s popularity and the state of marriage in America, however, the book is likely to become a bestseller.

Read Full Review of Committed: A Love Story | See more reviews from Kirkus

NY Times

Above average
on Jan 07 2010

And yet, if the sum of the parts in “Committed” add up to an awkward whole, many of those parts are nevertheless terrific. Gilbert provides an abundance of interesting factoids: ancient Roman law recognized marriage between aristocratic males...

Read Full Review of Committed: A Love Story | See more reviews from NY Times

Guardian

Above average
on Jan 10 2010

Gilbert is not at her most comfortable mired in socio-historical research, and the early parts of Committed are a garbled mess. Gilbert soon hits her stride, however, and the book grows into a lively commentary on a paradoxical institution...

Read Full Review of Committed: A Love Story | See more reviews from Guardian

WSJ online

Above average
on Jan 06 2010

..."Committed" is more careful than its predecessor to screen parts of Ms. Gilbert's private life from inquiring eyes. And while that choice may seem wise, it makes the book much less compelling. Sad to say, "Committed" is also less humane.

Read Full Review of Committed: A Love Story | See more reviews from WSJ online

Globe and Mail

Above average
Reviewed by Sarah Hampson on Jan 08 2010

But the fact that they have already decided to do what Gilbert then spends close to 300 pages worrying about is what makes the book less compelling than her first memoir. She is not trying to find anything.

Read Full Review of Committed: A Love Story | See more reviews from Globe and Mail

Entertainment Weekly

Above average
on Jan 04 2010

The deeper that Gilbert agonizes about marriage — the more she luxuriates in her dithering on What It Is All About — the more Committed loses its brightness, sharpness, and sense of welcome.

Read Full Review of Committed: A Love Story

LA Times

Above average
on Jan 03 2010

The problem is that this is a first-person account and the subject is love, and her life. She tells readers that she loves Felipe, but nowhere does she show a truly unique, poignant moment.

Read Full Review of Committed: A Love Story | See more reviews from LA Times

Dallas News

Good
on Jan 03 2010

Thus began a drawn-out immigration nightmare for the couple that, happily for readers, inspired Committed, a deeply compassionate, painstakingly researched and often laugh-out-loud-funny treatise on marriage.

Read Full Review of Committed: A Love Story

Review (Barnes & Noble)

Above average
on Jan 04 2010

And though the book is rather a mishmash (no disciplined, tripartite...does have a certain jumbled junk-shop charm, filled with random astute observations, amusing stories, and factual and literary bits and baubles for the reader to pause and admire.

Read Full Review of Committed: A Love Story

About.com

Good

This exploration of marriage is intense and personal...her findings support the idea that any good inquiry must be as unique as the person behind it. And any good marriage is defined as such by those who remain committed to it.

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About.com Bestsellers

Above average
on Jan 05 2010

Unfortunately, the book started to drag and even become somewhat tedious at chapter three. Here's the problem: Gilbert spends almost all of the following chapters summarizing what she learned about the history and sociology of marriage...

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Mail Online

Above average
on Feb 12 2010

Despite its relentless and sometimes wearisome talkiness, its Dictionary of Quotations scholarship and its tourist guide anthropology, it is as near to an honest attempt at self-knowledge as ever contrived.

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The New Yorker

Above average
on Jan 11 2010

So we should not be surprise...she decided “to put a little effort into unraveling the mystery of what in the name of God and human history this befuddling, vexing, contradictory, and yet stubbornly enduring institution of marriage actually is.

Read Full Review of Committed: A Love Story

Marie Claire

Good
on Dec 11 2009

Gilbert has given the antiquated institution a thorough once-over, and the clear-eyed primer is a must-read for any modern woman contemplating a trip down the aisle.

Read Full Review of Committed: A Love Story

Reader Rating for Committed
70%

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Amith Franky 20 Feb 2015

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