Conversations with Picasso by Brassai

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Synopsis

"Read this book if you want to understand me."--Pablo Picasso

Conversations with Picasso offers a remarkable vision of both Picasso and the entire artistic and intellectual milieu of wartime Paris, a vision provided by the gifted photographer and prolific author who spent the early portion of the 1940s photographing Picasso's work. Brassaï carefully and affectionately records each of his meetings and appointments with the great artist, building along the way a work of remarkable depth, intimate perspective, and great importance to anyone who truly wishes to understand Picasso and his world.


 

About Brassai

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Brassaï (born Gyula Halász, 1899—1984) was a photographer, journalist, and author of photographic monographs and literary works, including Letters to My Parents and Proust in the Power of Photography, both published by the University of Chicago Press.Jane Marie Todd is a translator whose books include Brassaï's Henry Miller, Happy Rock and Largesse by Jean Starobinski, both published by the University of Chicago Press.
 
Published December 15, 1999 by University of Chicago Press. 412 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Arts & Photography. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Conversations with Picasso

Publishers Weekly

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Originally published in English in 1966 but long out of print, Brassa 's intimate record of his friendship with Picasso is a remarkable, vibrant document, a dialogue between two creative giants. It sp

Dec 13 1999 | Read Full Review of Conversations with Picasso

Publishers Weekly

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Originally published in English in 1966 but long out of print, Brassa 's intimate record of his friendship with Picasso is a remarkable, vibrant document, a dialogue between two creative giants.

| Read Full Review of Conversations with Picasso

Brain Pickings

When Brassaï protests that few artists are gifted enough to be successful, citing something Matisse had once told him — “You have to be stronger than your gifts to protect them.” — Picasso counters by bringing down the ivory tower and renouncing the myth that “art suffers the moment other people ...

May 05 2014 | Read Full Review of Conversations with Picasso

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