Count Me In by Cynthia Weill
A Parade of Mexican Folk Art Numbers in English and Spanish (First Concepts in Mexican Folk Art) (English and Spanish Edition)

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Synopsis


Practice your numbers in English and Spanish when you count the beautiful dancers, playful musicians, and happy children of Oaxaca as the Guelaguetza parade goes by! Pronounced Gal-a-get-zah, the lively celebration—full of traditional dancing and music—takes place every July deep in the heart of southern Mexico. ONE band leader with a big white balloon! DOS hombres with firecrackers! THREE musicians! FOUR giants! All exquisitely handcrafted by the Mexican folk art masters Guillermina, Josefina, Irene, and Concepción Aguilar, in collaboration with author and scholar Cynthia Weill. Bienvenidos! Welcome to the parade!


Cynthia Weill is a professor and mentor to teachers at Columbia University's Teachers College. She also owns a non-profit—Aid to Women Artisans—that promotes the craftwork of artisans from developing countries. Count Me In is her fourth book in the First Concepts in Mexican Folk Art Series.


The Aguilar Sisters are Mexico's most beloved artisans. They learned how to make clay figurines from their mother Doña Isaura. These lively independent women are considered great masters of Mexican folk art and have been visited by Queen Elizabeth, Queen Sofia of Spain, various Mexican presidents, and Nelson Rockefeller. Their humorous ceramics of the people of their town and state are in museum collections the world over.


 

About Cynthia Weill

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Cynthia Weill holds a doctorate in education from Teachers College Columbia University. She is on the board of a foundation — Friends of Oaxacan Folk Art — that seeks to promote and preserve the artists and artisanal work of the state. Count Me In is the fourth book in her First Concepts in Mexican Folk Art Series.The Aguilar Sisters are Mexico’s most beloved artisans. They learned how to make clay figurines from their mother, Isaura Álcantara Diaz. These lively independent women are considered great masters of Mexican folk art and have been presented to Queen Elizabeth, Queen Sofia of Spain, various Mexican presidents and Nelson Rockefeller. Their humorous ceramics of the people of their town and state are in museum collections the world over.The collection of parade figures from Count Me In was acquired by the Field Museum in Chicago for its permanent collection. Notes and photographs based on the process of developing the figures are in the archives of that museum as well as in those of the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center at the University of Connecticut.
 
Published October 16, 2012 by Cinco Puntos Press. 32 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Travel, Children's Books.

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From “[e]l señor de la marota” who leads the parade, through musicians, costumed “giants,” flower-bearing ladies and more, folk-art ceramics offer clear, eye-catching figures for little ones to count.

Oct 15 2012 | Read Full Review of Count Me In: A Parade of Mexi...

Publishers Weekly

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Weill’s fourth title in the bilingual First Concepts in Mexican Folk Art series, a counting book, features photographs of ceramic figurines crafted by a quartet of Oaxacan artisans known as the Aguilar Sisters.

Nov 19 2012 | Read Full Review of Count Me In: A Parade of Mexi...

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