Crossing by Philip Booth

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Synopsis

Vivid images in both poem and paintings create a close-up view of a freight train traveling through a crossing—a dramatic experience for young readers.


With the rhythm of its words recalling the cadence of a moving freight train, a poem by Philip Booth is fluidly joined with artwork by first-time illustrator Bagram Ibatoulline in this majestic picture book. Ibatoulline's dramatic and masterful paintings capture the American freight train in its heyday in astonishing detail. CROSSING promises to enthrall train enthusiasts of all ages.
 

About Philip Booth

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Philip Booth is a Fellow of the Academy of American Poets and has been honored by Guggenheim, Rockefeller, and National Endowment for the Arts fellowships. The poem "Crossing" appeared in his first book, Letter from a Distant Land. Of his inspiration for the poem, he says, "I grew up in White River Junction, Vermont, where the White River and the Connecticut River come together. Many, many trains come down the river valley, traveling from Montreal to Boston, on to New Haven and beyond. The real crossing of this poem, though, is in Brunswick, Maine." Bagram Ibatoulline (pronounced E`bat`too LEEN) was born in Russia and graduated from the State Academic Institute of Arts in Moscow. He has worked in fine arts, graphic arts, mural design, and textile design. CROSSING is Bagram Ibatoulline's first picture book.From the Hardcover edition.
 
Published October 1, 2001 by Candlewick. 40 pages
Genres: Action & Adventure, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Crossing

Kirkus Reviews

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The locomotive sounds its old siren song in this pairing of a poem from Booth's first book and spectacularly realistic art from Russia-born Ibatoulline.

Jun 24 2010 | Read Full Review of Crossing

Publishers Weekly

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Over the next few days, Booth, still wracked with guilt, and Freddy, lurching into psychosis, try to make sense of what their lives have become--both of them uncertain and rather fatalistic about how their conflict will end.

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Publishers Weekly

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A group of friends, separated by the train and seen waving through its couplings, unite after the train departs.

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Publishers Weekly

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"This pairing of Booth's nearly 50-year-old poem with the exceedingly lifelike gouache paintings of a first-time illustrator is right on track," PW wrote in a starred review.

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Los Angeles Times

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Sean Penn brings the same visceral intensity and raw emotionality to writing and directing as he does to acting, and while that may sound like a good thing, it finally isn't.

Nov 15 1995 | Read Full Review of Crossing

Time Out New York

After six years of desperate, unrelieved mourning, Freddy Gale (Nicholson) feels his life has just one terminus: the murder of John Booth (Morse) who killed his daughter in a drunk-driving accident.

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Reader Rating for Crossing
87%

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