Darkness at Noon by Arthur Koestler

77%

6 Critic Reviews

Darkness at Noon still lives as a study of fear and victimhood, of state brutality, of unjust imprisonment, of interrogation and forced confession.
-Guardian

Synopsis

Darkness at Noon is set in an unnamed country ruled by a totalitarian government. Rubashov, once a powerful player in the regime, finds the tables turned on him when he is arrested and tried for treason. His reflections on his previous life and his experiences in prison form the heart of this moving and though-provoking masterpiece.
 

About Arthur Koestler

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Arthur Koestler was born on September 5, 1905 in Budapest, Hungary and studied at the University of Vienna. Koestler was a Middle East correspondent for several German newspapers, wrote for the Manchester Guardian, the London Times and the New York Herald Tribune. Koestler wrote Darkness at Noon, which centers on the destructiveness of politics, The Act of Creation, a book about creativity, and The Ghost in the Machine, which bravely attacks behaviorism. Arthur Koestler died in London on March 3, 1983.
 
Published January 1, 1966 by Bantam Books. 216 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Humor & Entertainment, Biographies & Memoirs, Action & Adventure, Westerns, Self Help, Parenting & Relationships, Professional & Technical, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, History, Political & Social Sciences, Science Fiction & Fantasy. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Darkness at Noon
All: 6 | Positive: 6 | Negative: 0

Kirkus

Good
on Nov 02 2011

Many serious studies have been made of the trials; this novel comes as near the sense of truth as any of them.

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Guardian

Above average
on Dec 26 2012

Darkness at Noon still lives as a study of fear and victimhood, of state brutality, of unjust imprisonment, of interrogation and forced confession.

Read Full Review of Darkness at Noon | See more reviews from Guardian

The Daily Beast

Good
Reviewed by David Frum on Aug 26 2012

...powerfully explain the mentality that led so many in the West to condone the trials, along with the other atrocities of the Stalin regime. They did so because they believed they were acting for the best in a world that otherwise seemed hopeless.

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New Statesman

Good
on Jan 23 2013

Brilliant as this book is as a novel, and a piece of brilliant literature, it is probably most valuable as an interpretation of the Moscow “confessions” by someone with an inner knowledge of totalitarian methods.

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Red Room

Good
on Oct 19 2011

The question we ask today--or at least some of us do--is whether such brutality occurs in our world, or could return...That's what makes Darkness at Noon relevant many decades after it was first published.

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Bookslut

Above average
Reviewed by Michael Schaub on Apr 14 2013

Koestler demonstrates you needn't sacrifice prose for ideas, and that's a valuable lesson for all aspiring activist writers...It's worth noting, though, that this book could use a new English translation.

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Reader Rating for Darkness at Noon
90%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 222 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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