Daughter of Lir by Judith Tarr

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 6 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

In this sequel to White Mare's Daughter, the people of the horse goddess once more face the threat of war.

Generations ago, the people of the White Mare migrated westward, through the great forests, until they met and clashed with the people of the cities of the Mother. They brought war to the cities, but in the end they made peace through alliance and marriage.

But now war threatens again.

Now there is something rumbling across the plains, coming from the East: a dreadful new weapon wielded by the tribes of the east as they once again begin to push westward. Rhian, a potter's daughter with the gift of seeing, has dreamed of these terrifying war chariots. Emrys, the King's son, has seen them at the edge of his kingdom.

Together, they must try to find a way to defend the Cities of the Mothers from a new invasion.

Tarr's series of books about the people of the Horse Goddess is a great and powerful saga from the mists of time. The tales she tells are the root of every legend, the heart of every myth. Judith Tarr has created a vividly believable tale of destiny you will never forget.
 

About Judith Tarr

See more books from this Author
Judith Tarr is the author of more than twenty widely praised novels, including The Throne of Isis, White Mare's Daughter, and Queen of Swords, as well as five previous volumes in the Avaryan Chronicles: The Hall of the Mountain King, The Lady of Han-Gilen and A Fall of Princes (collected in one volume as Avaryan Rising), Arrows of the Sun, and Spear of Heaven. A graduate of Yale and Cambridge University, Judith Tarr holds degrees in ancient and medieval history, and breeds Lipizzan horses at Dancing Horse Farm, her home in Vail, Arizona.
 
Published June 9, 2001 by Forge Books. 416 pages
Genres: History, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Daughter of Lir

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Whether or not, for instance, there actually were cities in Old Europe remains in question among historians, but not for Tarr, who finds the stuff of epic much livelier here as she’s cut loose from her usually lackluster limning of figures like Alexander the Great, Akhenaten, and Hatshepsut.

| Read Full Review of Daughter of Lir

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

As Otto's rule is threatened by his cousin Henry the Quarreller, Theophano's power increases: Her mother-in-law is banished for supporting Henry's claim to the throne, and Theophano is entrusted with Otto's heir, Otto III, and with the court.

| Read Full Review of Daughter of Lir

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Sequel to White Mare’s Daughter (1998) by ultraprolific romancer Tarr, a Yale-Cambridge graduate in history and now a breeder of Lipizzan horses on her ranch in Vail, Arizona.

| Read Full Review of Daughter of Lir

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

Aspasia's own story centers on her love affair with passionate Ismail, a stern, respected Moorish physician from Cordoba whom she meets when Theophano has a fever.

| Read Full Review of Daughter of Lir

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

Riding off from her village astride the living goddess White Mare after she is passed over by a priestess recruiter, Rhian joins forces with Prince Emry, her brother by birth as well as in arms.

| Read Full Review of Daughter of Lir

RT Book Reviews

Search books by title, genre, publication month, publication year, and rating or search by any combination of these options (i.e.

| Read Full Review of Daughter of Lir

Reader Rating for Daughter of Lir
97%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 7 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×