Daughters of the Declaration by Claire Gaudiani & David Graham Burnett
How Women Social Entrepreneurs Built the American Dream

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Synopsis

America’s founding fathers established an idealistic framework for a bold experiment in democratic governance. The new nation would be built on the belief that “all men are created equal, and are endowed...with a right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” The challenge of turning these ideals into reality for all citizens was taken up by a set of exceptional American women.

Distinguished scholar and civic leader Claire Gaudiani calls these women “social entrepreneurs,” arguing that they brought the same drive and strategic intent to their pursuit of “the greater good” that their male counterparts applied to building the nation's capital markets throughout the nineteenth century. Gaudiani tells the stories of these patriotic women, and their creation of America's unique not-for-profit, or “social profit” sector. She concludes that the idealism and optimism inherent in this work provided an important asset to the increasing prosperity of the nation from its founding to the Second World War. Social entrepreneurs have defined a system of governance “by the people,” and they remain our best hope for continued moral leadership in the world.

 

About Claire Gaudiani & David Graham Burnett

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Claire Gaudiani served as president of Connecticut College from 1988 until 2001 and continues to serve as volunteer president of the New London Development Corporation. She is currently a senior research scholar at Yale Law School and lives in Groton and New Haven, Connecticut.
 
Published November 8, 2011 by PublicAffairs. 355 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, History, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Daughters of the Declaration

Kirkus Reviews

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A look at how, by inventing philanthropic institutions, American women have played a crucial role shaping the American economy since the first days of the Revolution.

Sep 15 2011 | Read Full Review of Daughters of the Declaration:...

Publishers Weekly

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American philanthropy expert Gaudiani (Generosity Unbound) and husband Burnett, a retired academic and business administrator, begin with the story of Esther Reed, the wife of a Pennsylvania governor, who published a 1778 broadsheet setting out a bold plan for national women’s fund-raising orga...

Sep 26 2011 | Read Full Review of Daughters of the Declaration:...

Huntington News

Chicago plays a major role in creating opportunities for women social entrepreneurs, the authors write, noting the contributions of the University of Chicago, which accepted women graduate students from its founding by John D.

Mar 26 2012 | Read Full Review of Daughters of the Declaration:...

Newcity Lit

But Prohibition, the authors write, “was a victory orchestrated by the largest and broadest coalition of women up to that point in American history—women intent upon increasing the security of their homes and of the nation.” The temperance movement “is also inextricably linked throughout its hist...

Feb 24 2012 | Read Full Review of Daughters of the Declaration:...

Stanford Social Innovation Review

Daughters of the Declaration: How Women Social Entrepreneurs Built the American Dream.

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Stanford Social Innovation Review

In Daughters of the Declaration: How Women Social Entrepreneurs Built the American Dream, these authors argue that American women actually invented social entrepreneurship.

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