Dear Benjamin Banneker by Andrea Davis Pinkney

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Throughout his life Banneker was troubled that all blacks were not free. And so, in 1791, he wrote to Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, who had signed the Declaration of Independence. Banneker attacked the institution of slavery and dared to call Jefferson a hypocrite for owning slaves. Jefferson responded. This is the story of Benjamin Banneker--his science, his politics, his morals, and his extraordinary correspondence with Thomas Jefferson. Illustrated in full-page scratchboard and oil paintings by Caldecott Honor artist Brian Pinkney.


About Andrea Davis Pinkney

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ANDREA DAVIS PINKNEY is the author of many award-winning picture books, including the critically acclaimed" Let It Shine: Stories of Black Women Freedom Fighters", which won a Coretta Scott King Author Honor. She has also collaborated with her husband, illustrator Brian Pinkney, on several books, including Duke Ellington: The Piano Prince and His Orchestra and Sleeping Cutie. The Pinkneys live in Brooklyn, New York. Brian Pinkney is one of the most celebrated talents in children's publishing. In his career he has won two Caldecott Honors, a Coretta Scott King medal, a "Boston Globe-Horn Book" Award, and three Coretta Scott King Honors. For Simon & Schuster he illustrated "The Faithful Friend, " which won the Caldecott Honor and Coretta Scott King Honor, "Sukey and the Mermaid, " which won the Coretta Scott King Honor, and "The Adventures of Sparrowboy, " which won the "Boston Globe-Horn Book" Award. He lives with his wife and two children in Brooklyn, New York -- which is where this story takes place.
Published October 31, 1994 by HMH Books for Young Readers. 32 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Children's Books. Non-fiction

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Banneker protested ``the almost general prejudice and prepossession which is so previlent [sic] in the world against those of my complexion'' and criticized Jefferson for holding slaves, detained ``by fraud and violence,'' despite his claim, in the Declaration of Independence, that ``all men are ...

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Publishers Weekly

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Banneker's frustration led him to write to Thomas Jefferson, then Secretary of State, pointing out the statesman's inconsistency in proclaiming that all men are created equal even as he owned slaves.

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