Desolation Flats by Andrew Hunt
A Mystery (An Art Oveson Mystery)

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Once the murder is connected to the Nazis, everyone becomes a potential suspect—except, of course, Hunt’s improbably virtuous hero, whom readers are likely to either love or loathe.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

In the summer of 1938, as war clouds loom overseas, auto racers from around the world gather at the Bonneville Salt Flats west of Salt Lake City, intent on breaking the land-speed record. But when Clive Underhill, a wealthy English motorist, mysteriously disappears and his younger brother, Nigel, is found dead, Art Oveson of the Salt Lake City Missing Persons Bureau is called to investigate.

Suddenly, Art’s best friend and former partner, Roscoe Lund, becomes the number-one suspect in Nigel’s murder, prompting Art to follow a murky trail involving homegrown fascists, bigoted ex-cops, a string of homicides, and a German auto racer with a mysterious past. And, through it all, FBI Agent Frank Oveson tries to prevent his “kid brother” Art from discovering dark truths that may threaten his life.

Tony Hillerman Prize–winning author and historian Andrew Hunt transports us to 1930s Salt Lake City in Desolation Flats, this engrossing, detailed mystery that shows what goes on behind the scenes in the supposedly clean-cut Mormon capital.

 

About Andrew Hunt

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ANDREW HUNT is a professor of history in Waterloo, Ontario. His areas of study include post-1945 U.S. History, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, and the American West. He has written reviews for The Globe and Mail and The National Post, authored two works of nonfiction, The Turning and David Dellinger, and is coauthor of The 1980s. He grew up in Salt Lake City and currently lives in Canada.
 
Published November 15, 2016 by Minotaur Books. 385 pages
Genres: History, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Kirkus

Above average
on Aug 31 2016

Once the murder is connected to the Nazis, everyone becomes a potential suspect—except, of course, Hunt’s improbably virtuous hero, whom readers are likely to either love or loathe.

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