Destination by Seymour Simon
Space

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Synopsis

For over a century the idea of a black hole was merely a theory, one that was fiercely debated. Then, while using the Hubble Space Telescope to observe a distant galaxy, scientists were able to take the first pictures of a black hole. A mystery that existed for over a hundred years was solved!

Launched in 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope is still sending us images of the cosmos never before seen by the human eye. There are more pictures and new discoveries every day. Orbiting above the atmosphere, the Hubble Space Telescope can see into space ten times more clearly than the most powerful telescope on Earth.

In Destination: Space, stunning visuals illustrate major discoveries as Seymour Simon explains what each carefully chosen image has shown us about the universe. Capturing fascinating and complex scientific discoveries in dramatic photographs and an easy-to-understand text, Seymour Simon once again shows why he is widely regarded as one of America's most exciting and informative authors.

 

About Seymour Simon

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Seymour Simon has been called "the dean of the [children's science book] field" by the New York Times. He has written more than 200 books for young readers and is the recipient of the Science Books & Films Key Award for Excellence in Science Books, the Empire State Award for excellence in literature for young people, and the Educational Paperback Association Jeremiah Ludington Award. Mr. Simon lives in Great Neck, New York, with his wife.
 
Published May 23, 2006 by HarperCollins. 32 pages
Genres: Children's Books.

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The dean of science-writers for the grammar-school set offers comments on over a dozen big, dramatic photos and photo collages generated by the Hubble Space Telescope, from a sharply focused triple image of Mars to a tiny red arc identified as the most distant galaxy every observed.

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Kirkus Reviews

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The dean of science-writers for the grammar-school set offers comments on over a dozen big, dramatic photos and photo collages generated by the Hubble Space Telescope, from a sharply focused triple image of Mars to a tiny red arc identified as the most distant galaxy every observed.

May 20 2010 | Read Full Review of Destination: Space

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