Disappearing Moon Cafe by Sky Lee

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Synopsis

Sometimes funny, sometimes scandalous, always compelling, this extraordinary first novel chronicles the women of the Wong family from frontier railroad camps to modern-day Vancouver. As past sins and inborn strengths are passed on from mother to daughter to granddaughter, each generation confronts, in its own way, the same problems — isolation, racism, and the clash of cultures. Moving effortlessly between past and present, between North America and China, Sky Lee weaves fiction and historical fact into a memorable and moving picture of a people’s struggle for identity.
 

About Sky Lee

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Published September 1, 1991 by Howard E Seals. 288 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Gay & Lesbian. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Disappearing Moon Cafe

Kirkus Reviews

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A compelling first novel by the Canadian Lee that tries to do for Asian-Canadian women what Amy Tan and Maxine Hong-Kingston have done for their Asian-American counterparts: give mythical shape to the experiences of immigration, assimilation, and struggle for identity in the West.

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Publishers Weekly

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Lee's powerful and elaborate first novel traces generations of a Chinese-Canadian family and their ties to and clashes with one another, their cultures, and their land in China and North America. (Sep

Aug 03 1992 | Read Full Review of Disappearing Moon Cafe

Publishers Weekly

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Lee's powerful and elaborate first novel traces generations of a Chinese-Canadian family and their ties to and clashes with one another, their cultures, and their land in China and North America. (Sep

Aug 03 1992 | Read Full Review of Disappearing Moon Cafe

Los Angeles Times

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Beginning in 1892, when young Wong Gwei Chang is sent to Canada to retrieve the bones of men from his native village who died building the transcontinental railroad, the story becomes a remarkable chronicle of acculturation, similar in essential respects to other immigrant sagas but uniquely flav...

Nov 15 1991 | Read Full Review of Disappearing Moon Cafe

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