Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra & Edith Grossman

75%

15 Critic Reviews

Grossman is a veteran of contemporary Latin-American literature. She comes to Cervantes with great experience and a fine ear for the nuances of Spanish and brings off the remarkable feat of giving the reader an utterly modern text that is still, unmistakably, a novel of the seventeenth century.
-Guardian

Synopsis

Don Quixote has become so entranced reading tales of chivalry that he decides to turn knight errant himself. In the company of his faithful squire, Sancho Panza, these exploits blossom in all sorts of wonderful ways. While Quixote's fancy often leads him astray—he tilts at windmills, imagining them to be giants—Sancho acquires cunning and a certain sagacity. Sane madman and wise fool, they roam the world together-and together they have haunted readers' imaginations for nearly four hundred years.

With its experimental form and literary playfulness, Don Quixote has been generally recognized as the first modern novel. This Penguin Classics edition, with its beautiful new cover design, includes John Rutherford's masterly translation, which does full justice to the energy and wit of Cervantes's prose, as well as a brilliant critical introduction by Roberto Gonzalez Echevarriá.

 

 

About Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra & Edith Grossman

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Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (1547-1616) , the son of a poor Spanish surgeon, achieved enormous success with the publication of the first part of Don Quixote in 1605. John Rutherford is a fellow of Queen's College, Oxford, where he teaches Spanish and Spanish-American language and literature. Roberto González Echevarríais Sterling Professor of Hispanic and Comparative Literatures at Yale.
 
Published January 30, 2003 by Penguin. 1060 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Education & Reference, Action & Adventure, History, Humor & Entertainment, Romance. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Don Quixote
All: 15 | Positive: 14 | Negative: 1

Publishers Weekly

Above average
on Jan 12 2016

...though the architectural details, period apparel and scenery are all richly evocative, the characters themselves are often small in scale and dwarfed by their stunning surroundings. Nevertheless, the presence of an elegantly produced, picture book version of this classic merits attention and applause.

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Publishers Weekly

Excellent
on Nov 10 2003

Against the odds, Grossman has given us an honest, robust and freshly revelatory Quixote for our times.

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NY Times

Above average
Reviewed by Carlos Fuentes on Nov 02 2003

Edith Grossman delivers her ''Quixote'' in plain but plentiful contemporary English...This ''Don Quixote'' can be read with the same ease as the latest Philip Roth...Yet there is not a single moment in which, in forthright English, we are not reading a 17th-century novel. This is truly masterly: the contemporaneous and the original co-exist.

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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Robert McCrum on Jan 24 2004

Grossman is a veteran of contemporary Latin-American literature. She comes to Cervantes with great experience and a fine ear for the nuances of Spanish and brings off the remarkable feat of giving the reader an utterly modern text that is still, unmistakably, a novel of the seventeenth century.

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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by AS Byatt on Jan 23 2004

Edith Grossman's translation has been described as a masterpiece. It has energy and clarity, and she has invented a robust style which is neither modern nor ancient.

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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Robert McCrum on Jan 24 2004

Don Quixote is one of those books more referred to than read. This new edition should persuade contemporary readers to explore the bizarre, and strangely modern, world of the sorrowful knight, his faithful squire Sancho Panza, his steed Rosinante, and his only true love, Dulcinea.

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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by AS Byatt on Jan 23 2004

Edith Grossman's translation has been described as a masterpiece. It has energy and clarity, and she has invented a robust style which is neither modern nor ancient.

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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Harold Bloom on Dec 12 2003

Reading her amazing mode of finding equivalents in English for Cervantes's darkening vision is an entrance into a further understanding of why this great book contains within itself all the novels that have followed in its sublime wake.

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PopMatters

Above average
Reviewed by Daulton Dickey on Jan 21 2004

The prose of Grossman’s admirable translation is fluid and funny, intelligent and graceful—despite the occasional clunky sentence.

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ReadySteadyBook

Good
Reviewed by Mark Thwaite on Jul 18 2005

I read a fairly wide smattering of all the best but avoided Don Quixote - too big, too old, probably too hard, probably boring ... but no, no, no, no! Bloom is right, Don Quixote is wonderful, and easily (one of) the very best ...

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Curled Up

Above average
on Aug 18 2014

Cervantes writes about his time and about the Spanish character, but he also writes about human nature, universal hopes, general historical and social factors. Whatever one thinks of Don Quixote, this extremely long novel is a classic...

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Book Loons

Good
Reviewed by Marian Powell on Aug 18 2014

Today, it is finally possible to read Don Quixote in English, and to get a feel for the way it was originally written, and what Miguel De Cervantes intended to convey. The new translation by Edith Grossman is fresh, lively and exciting.

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Shelf Love

Above average
Reviewed by Jenny on Jun 19 2012

...this novel reads excitingly, cracklingly modern. The idiom is up-to-date, the pace is swift, and the ideas, for the most part, are as complex and fruitful — no, more so! — than 95% of what you find in any contemporary bookstore.

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ANZ LitLovers LitBlog

Below average
Reviewed by Lisa Hill on May 22 2009

...I, at last, have reached the end! I admit to feeling disappointed: reading this ancient story became a quest in itself, as insane as any of Don Q’s. I am sure that in recording my banal conclusions and confusions I have done no more than waste my own time, as well as anyone persistent enough to read this blog post to the end.

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http://splendidlabyrinths.blogspot.com

Good
on Jun 12 2012

This is a first-rate masterwork and the first truly modern, psychological novel. Moreover, it is a story about a protagonist in the progress of losing his illusions...

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Reader Rating for Don Quixote
81%

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