Donald Barthelme by Helen Moore Barthelme
The Genesis of a Cool Sound (Tarleton State University Southwestern Studies in the Humanities)

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 7 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

Chronicling a literary life that ended not so long ago, Donald Barthelme: The Genesis of a Cool Sound gives the reader a glimpse at the years when Barthelme began to find his literary voice. A revealing look at Donald Barthelme's influences and development, this account begins with a detailed biographical sketch of his life and spans his growth into a true avant-garde literary figure.

Donald Barthleme was born in Philadelphia but raised in Houston, the son of a forward-thinking architect father and a literary mother. Educated at the University of Houston, he became a fine arts critic for the Houston Post; then, following duty in the Korean conflict, he returned to the Post for a short time before becoming editor for Forum literary magazine. After that, he was also director of the Contemporary Arts Museum while writing and publishing his first stories.

In the 1960s he moved to New York, where he became editor of Location and was able to practice the art of short fiction in such vehicles as the New Yorker and Harper's Bazaar. In a witty, playful, ironic, and bizarrely imaginative style, he wrote more than one hundred short stories and several novels over the years.

In this literary memoir, Donald Barthelme's former wife, Helen Moore Barthelme, offers insights into his career as well as his private life, focusing especially on the decade they were married, from the mid-fifties to the mid-sixties, a period when he was developing the forms and genres that made him famous. During that time Barthelme was finding his voice as a writer and his short stories were beginning to receive notice. In her memoir, Helen Moore Barthelme writes about Donald's early years and her life with him in Houston and New York. In open, straightforward language she tells about their love for each other and about the events that finally divided them. She also describes, from the point of view of the person closest to Donald during that time, the making of one of the most original and imaginative American writers of the twentieth century.

Scholars of avant-garde American literature will gain insider perspective to one man's life and the years which, for all their myriad joys and downturns, produced some of the best-remembered works in the literary canon.

 

About Helen Moore Barthelme

See more books from this Author
Helen Moore Barthelme is senior lecturer of English at Texas A&M University. Former professor at the University of Houston and Dominican College in Houston, she holds the Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin.
 
Published May 1, 2001 by Texas A&M University Press. 246 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Donald Barthelme

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Though the preface by editor Herzinger makes a case that the third posthumously published volume of the author’s work is the “crown jewel of the project,” the fact remains that these are the stories that the writer himself considered the bottom third.

| Read Full Review of Donald Barthelme: The Genesis...

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

guardian.co.uk Latest books added to lists Added by came531 ...

Nov 15 2012 | Read Full Review of Donald Barthelme: The Genesis...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

Barthelme, a senior lecturer of English at Texas A&M University, was married to Donald Barthelme for a decade in the 1950s and '60s;

| Read Full Review of Donald Barthelme: The Genesis...

The New York Review of Books

RSS Facebook Twitter The New York Review of Books Advanced Search Current Issu...

| Read Full Review of Donald Barthelme: The Genesis...

New York Magazine

My laborers were all perched on the shoulders of little native page-turners, reading advance copies of Flying to America, the uncollected short stories of Donald Barthelme.

Nov 04 2007 | Read Full Review of Donald Barthelme: The Genesis...

Project MUSE

"Gog," he calls his little son-to-be, who, in the funniest riff in the story, he compares to a battleship: It's like somebody walks up to you and says, I have a battleship I can't use, would you like to have a battleship.

| Read Full Review of Donald Barthelme: The Genesis...

The Paris Review

An irreverent, harrowing, tough-minded account of Martin’s experience in Alcoholics Anonymous, which he describes (characteristically) as “the cult that saved my life.” —Lorin Stein I’ve begun reading George Gissing’s New Grub Street, a late Victorian novel of the literary demimonde, which on...

Dec 17 2010 | Read Full Review of Donald Barthelme: The Genesis...

Reader Rating for Donald Barthelme
82%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 7 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×