Dreamland by Howard M. Sachar
Europeans and Jews in the Aftermath of the Great War

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Synopsis

By the end of World War I, in November 1918, Europe’s old authoritarian empires had fallen, and new and seemingly democratic governments were rising from the debris. As successor states found their place on the map, many hoped that a more liberal Europe would emerge. But this post-war idealism all too quickly collapsed under the political and economic pressures of the 1920s and '30s. Howard M. Sachar chronicles this visionary and tempestuous era by examining the fortunes of Europe’s Jewish minority, a group whose precarious status made them particularly sensitive to changes in the social order. Writing with characteristic lucidity and verve, Sachar spotlights an array of charismatic leaders–from Hungarian Communist Bela Kun to Germany’s Rosa Luxemburg, France’s Socialist Prime Minister Léon Blum and Austria’s Sigmund Freud–whose collective experience foretold significant democratic failures long before the Nazi rise to power. In the richness of its human tapestry and the acuity of its social insights, Dreamland masterfully expands our understanding of a watershed era in modern history.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Howard M. Sachar

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Howard M. Sachar is the author of numerous books, including A History of Israel, A History of the Jews in America, Farewell España, and Israel and Europe. He is also the editor of the 39-volume The Rise of Israel: A Documentary History. He serves as Professor of Modern History at George Washington University, is a consultant and lecturer on Middle Eastern affairs for numerous governmental bodies, and lectures widely in the United States and abroad. He lives in Kensington, Maryland.
 
Published December 18, 2007 by Vintage. 385 pages
Genres: History. Non-fiction

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Some of the tension, the author notes, sprang from anti-Semitic nationalist movements, some from the redrawing of national boundaries after WWI that among other things placed 4.5 million non-Romanians under Bucharest’s rule, turning “an essentially homogeneous population into a complex mosaic of ...

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In the political and social chaos that followed WWI, Jewish communities throughout Europe found themselves in new, often contradictory positions that seemed to suggest fresh possibilities for integ

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In the political and social chaos that followed WWI, Jewish communities throughout Europe found themselves in new, often contradictory positions that seemed to suggest fresh possibilities for integration, explains Sachar (author of the highly regarded The History of Jews in America) in this acces...

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