Dunbar by Edward St. Aubyn
(Hogarth Shakespeare)

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 7 Critic Reviews

St. Aubyn's writing has a lavishness that still retains precision — he never allows mistiness to descend on his metaphors, however extended.
-NPR

Synopsis

A reimagining of one of Shakespeare's most well-read tragedies, by the contemporary, critcally acclaimed master of domestic drama

Henry Dunbar, the once all-powerful head of a global media corporation, is not having a good day. In his dotage he hands over care of the corporation to his two eldest daughters, Abby and Megan, but as relations sour he starts to doubt the wisdom of past decisions.
 
Now imprisoned in Meadowmeade, an upscale sanatorium in rural England, with only a demented alcoholic comedian as company, Dunbar starts planning his escape. As he flees into the hills, his family is hot on his heels. But who will find him first, his beloved youngest daughter, Florence, or the tigresses Abby and Megan, so keen to divest him of his estate?
 
Edward St Aubyn is renowned for his masterwork, the five Melrose novels, which dissect with savage and beautiful precision the agonies of family life. His take on King Lear, Shakespeare’s most devastating family story, is an excoriating novel for and of our times – an examination of power, money and the value of forgiveness.
 

About Edward St. Aubyn

See more books from this Author
Edward St. Aubyn was born in London in 1960. He is the author of A Clue to the Exit and On the Edge; a series of novels about the Melrose family, including the trilogy Some Hope; and Mother's Milk, which was shortlisted for the 2006 Man Booker Prize.
 
Published October 3, 2017 by Hogarth. 258 pages
Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Literature & Fiction, Humor & Entertainment. Fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Dunbar
All: 7 | Positive: 5 | Negative: 2

NPR

Good
Reviewed by Annalisa Quinn on Oct 05 2017

St. Aubyn's writing has a lavishness that still retains precision — he never allows mistiness to descend on his metaphors, however extended.

Read Full Review of Dunbar (Hogarth Shakespeare) | See more reviews from NPR

NY Times

Below average
Reviewed by Cynthia Ozick on Oct 25 2017

Retelling becomes reliving, a fleeting wisp of Shakespeare’s elusive breath. All the rest, in the usual way of thriller fiction, is puppetry and plot.

Read Full Review of Dunbar (Hogarth Shakespeare) | See more reviews from NY Times

LA Times

Above average
Reviewed by Bethanne Patrick on Sep 28 2017

We all know that things will not end well; it’s “King Lear.” While St. Aubyn remains faithful at the final moment to Shakespeare, allowing Wilson (Albany) to utter the final words, he also uses the words to his own suitably bleak yet ultimately hopeful finish...

Read Full Review of Dunbar (Hogarth Shakespeare) | See more reviews from LA Times

The Maine Edge

Excellent
Reviewed by Allen Adams on Oct 11 2017

Powerful, compelling family drama of the first order – that’s what Edward St. Aubyn gives us here. It is a churning whirlwind of a book, inviting the reader to tear through pages to an almost compulsive degree. Sharp and smart and exceptionally written, “Dunbar” is yet another outstanding addition to the Hogarth Shakespeare catalog.

Read Full Review of Dunbar (Hogarth Shakespeare)

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Stephanie Merritt on Oct 16 2017

He has transplanted the heart of the story into the present and made it feel remarkably authentic. I wonder if anyone has sent Rupert Murdoch a copy.

Read Full Review of Dunbar (Hogarth Shakespeare) | See more reviews from Guardian

Guardian

Below average
Reviewed by Kate Clanchy on Sep 30 2017

Jane Smiley demonstrated in A Thousand Acres that it is possible to make King Lear say something new...St Aubyn’s Dunbar, in contrast, simply recounts the tale of how painful it is when an old, powerful man loses everything. It’s still a sad story, but it is also a more limited one than this immensely talented writer can tell.

Read Full Review of Dunbar (Hogarth Shakespeare) | See more reviews from Guardian

Toronto Star

Good
Reviewed by Emily Donaldson on Oct 20 2017

This tale of a wealthy, arrogant, insecure egomaniac who surrounds himself with mutiny-ready incompetents confirms the series’ inarguable premise: that Shakespeare is a writer for all ages, but it also confirms that St Aubyn is one of the sharpest of our own.

Read Full Review of Dunbar (Hogarth Shakespeare) | See more reviews from Toronto Star

Reader Rating for Dunbar
70%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 29 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×