Each Thing Unblurred is Broken by Andrea Baker

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The laconic, mysterious single lines in this second volume from Baker (Like Wind Loves a Window) look back to the poetry of the 1970s, with prayer-like overtones, flirtations with minimalism, and a search for answers among birds, stones, and bones.
-Publishers Weekly

Synopsis

This is a book about deciding not to die—about the obstinacy of being. And it’s a book of craft, in which steadiness of presence generates the illumination that flickers through states darkened by steady crisis. The world is blurred, not broken. And a lyric I comes to rest in the world.
 

About Andrea Baker

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ANDREA BAKER is the author of Famous Rapes (Water Street Press, 2015), a paper and packing tape constructed not-quite-graphic-novel about the depiction of sexual assault from Mesopotamia to the present day. She has been a Poetry Society of America Chapbook Fellow, and in 2005 she was awarded the Slope Editions Book Prize for Like Wind Loves a Window. Her recent work has appeared in Denver Quarterly, Fence, Pleiades, The Rumpus, Tin House, and Typo. It has also been anthologized in Family Resemblance: An Anthology of Eight Hybrid Literary Genres (Rose Metal Press, 2015), Verse Daily, and Broken Land: Poems of Brooklyn (New York University Press, 2007). In addition to her work on the page, she is a subject in the documentary, A Rubberband is an Unlikely Instrument. She works as an appraiser of arts and antiques in New York City.
 
Published November 3, 2015 by Omnidawn. 96 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Publishers Weekly

Above average
on Nov 13 2015

The laconic, mysterious single lines in this second volume from Baker (Like Wind Loves a Window) look back to the poetry of the 1970s, with prayer-like overtones, flirtations with minimalism, and a search for answers among birds, stones, and bones.

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