Emerson by RalphWaldo Emerson
Selected Essays: Selected Essays

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 17 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

Ralph Waldo Emerson believed that an appreciation of its vast natural resources would become the foundation of American culture. His assertion that human thought and actions proceed from nature, was a radical departure from the traditional European emphasis on domesticating nature to suit human needs. His philosophy is rich in common natural scenes of daily life, and expresses the inherent harmony between man and nature. This collection brings together 15 of Emerson's most significant essays, including "Nature", "The American Scholar", "Self-reliance" and "The Transcendentalist", as well as his assessments of Montaigne, Napoleon and Thoreau.
 

About RalphWaldo Emerson

See more books from this Author
Ralph Waldo Emerson, the son of a Unitarian minister and a chaplain during the American Revolution, was born in 1803 in Boston. He attended the Boston Latin School, and in 1817 entered Harvard, graduating in 1820. Emerson supported himself as a schoolteacher from 1821-26. In 1826 he was "approbated to preach," and in 1829 became pastor of the Scond Church (Unitarian) in Boston. That same year he married Ellen Louise Tucker, who was to die of tuberculosis only seventeen months later. In 1832 Emerson resigned his pastorate and traveled to Eurpe, where he met Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Carlyle. He settled in Concord, Massachusetts, in 1834, where he began a new career as a public lecturer, and married Lydia Jackson a year later. A group that gathered around Emerson in Concord came to be known as "the Concord school," and included Bronson Alcott, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Margaret Fuller. Every year Emerson made a lecture tour; and these lectures were the source of most of his essays. Nature (1836), his first published work, contained the essence of his transcendental philosophy , which views the world of phenomena as a sort of symbol of the inner life and emphasizes individual freedom and self-reliance. Emerson's address to the Phi Beta Kappa society of Harvard (1837) and another address to the graduating class of the Harvard Divinity School (1838) applied his doctrine to the scholar and the clergyman, provoking sharp controversy. An ardent abolitionist, Emerson lectured and wrote widely against slavery from the 1840's through the Civil War. His principal publications include two volumes of Essays (1841, 1844), Poems (1847), Representative Men (1850), The Conduct of Life (1860), and Society and Solitude (1870). He died of pneumonia in 1882 and was buried in Concord.Larzer Ziff is a research professor of English at Johns Hopkins University who has written extensively on American literary culture.
 
Published April 29, 1982 by Penguin Classic. 420 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Law & Philosophy, Nature & Wildlife, Science & Math. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Emerson

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

Lawrence Buell's "Emerson" lucidly clarifies his subject's central ideas without grinding their contradictions to mush.

Aug 10 2003 | Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

Having said this, like all musicians whose performances and music are brimful of emotion, his love-life mirrored this emotive side as well, and his obvious love for his children, and the women who have been part of his life, shines through.

Dec 19 2003 | Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

BC Books

See more reviews from this publication

Got to admit that seeing Gregory Manchess’ suitably seedy cover (nekkid girl holding a knife suggestively down her backside while another femme — Rita, perhaps — undresses the duo’s impending victim) attached to a hardback dust cover was a little bit odd, but it’s great to see this sturdy line of...

Sep 05 2011 | Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

Suite 101

Emerson provides 20 quick and easy patchwork projects for the home, including patterns for potholders, an apron, table runner and cushions.

May 30 2011 | Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

Review (Barnes & Noble)

On this day in 1882 Ralph Waldo Emerson died, aged seventy-eight.

Apr 27 2013 | Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

The New York Review of Books

Emersonian individualism in at least one variant has commanded the power to bring about recurrent invigorations of American culture—perhaps also, if only marginally, American politics.

May 28 1987 | Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

The New York Review of Books

Vann Woodward only repeats the method of the lectures under review, Lewis Simpson’s Mind and the American Civil War [NYR, March 15], when he arranges excerpts from the public writings of Thomas Jefferson, but from the private writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, to portray the Virginian as a “distin...

Jun 14 1990 | Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

The New York Review of Books

Richardson points out in his splendid little book on Emerson as a guide for the writer, First We Read, Then We Write, for Emerson “the sentence—not the paragraph and not the essay—is the main structural and formal unit.” This is the most striking characteristic of Emerson’s remarkable prose style...

Dec 03 2009 | Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

The New York Review of Books

While Mumford welcomed publication of the complete Journals (the previous ten-volume edition, edited by Emerson's son Edward Waldo Emerson, and his grandson Waldo Emerson Forbes, sixty years earlier, contained only a partial, somewhat bowdlerized selection), he objected to the Harvard editors' de...

Oct 28 2010 | Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

The New York Review of Books

Though Cabot was too old to participate in the editing of the Journals, Emerson’s son, Dr. Edward Waldo Emerson, the physician, with the help of Emerson’s grandson, Waldo Emerson Forbes, waded through Emerson’s notebooks and selected, out of the formidable welter, what they judged to be readable,...

| Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

Spirituality & Practice

Geldard on Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882): God in Concord and The Spiritual Teachings of Ralph Waldo Emerson;

| Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

Spirituality & Practice

Ralph Waldo Emerson's (1803-1882) quest for truth, meaning, and the authentic life was at the heart of his writing and teaching.

| Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

Spirituality & Practice

The spiritual teachings of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) .

| Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

Open Salon

Vedanta understands laws of nature not as being of divine making, not made by something somehow outside of creation, but rather laws of nature are understood as the whole, as the essence of the Divine itself made manifest.

May 09 2012 | Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

ForeWord Reviews

“Experience” is a basic term and concept for Emerson because, Van Cromphout stresses, he seeks to replace a deadening sense of routine with an intuitive, spontaneous response to “everyday life.” This capacity for childlike surprise is no elitist philosophical pursuit but an essential opportunity ...

Feb 13 1999 | Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

ForeWord Reviews

The work possesses innumerable rich passages, but also contains the mundane details that make up a life: comments on visitors, observations on the weather, and random facts that Emerson found worthy of jotting down, but which aren’t connected to any larger thoughts.

| Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

Ben Casnocha

Richardson’s biography of Ralph Waldo Emerson called Emerson: The Mind on Fire.

May 30 2005 | Read Full Review of Emerson: Selected Essays: Sel...

Reader Rating for Emerson
75%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 7 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×