Emily Dickinson's Letters to the World by Jeanette Winter

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Synopsis

A captivating introduction to Emily Dickinson

The poet Emily Dickinson was unknown and mostly unpublished during her lifetime (1830–86). When she died, her sister, Lavinia, discovered the 1,775 poems Emily Dickinson left behind – her “letters to the world.” Jeanette Winter tells the story of the discovery of these poems and has selected twenty-one that speak most directly to children, surrounding them with vibrant paintings.

With a specifically designed typeface inspired by Emily Dickinson’s handwriting, this small book, which is about the size of some of the paper on which Emily wrote, is a gem.
 

About Jeanette Winter

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Jeanette Winter is the author and illustrator of many notable books for children, including My Baby and My Name Is Georgia. She lives in New York City.
 
Published March 19, 2002 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR). 40 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Emily Dickinson's Letters to the World

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To the 22 carefully selected poems, the artist pairs simply drawn folk-art scenes of a white-gowned figure ruminatively observing outdoor settings, and sandwiches it all with an invented narrative from Emily’s sister, Lavinia, that fills in a bit of background about the poet’s cloistered life.

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Publishers Weekly

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"My sister Emily was buried today," begins this wisp of a picture book, part thumbnail biography and part miniature poetry anthology. For the next several pages, a mournful Lavinia reminisc

Jan 07 2002 | Read Full Review of Emily Dickinson's Letters to ...

Publishers Weekly

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Verses about nature predominate ("A Spider sewed at Night/ Without a Light/ Upon an Arc of White"), but Winter does not shy away from more metaphysical themes ("Exultation is the going/ Of an inland soul to sea,/ Past the houses—past the headlands—/ Into deep Eternity—").

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