Emma's War by Deborah Scroggins
An aid worker, a warlord, radical Islam, and the politics of oil--a true story of love and death in Sudan

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Synopsis

Emma McCune’s passion for Africa, her unstinting commitment to the children of Sudan, and her youthful beauty and glamour set her apart from other relief workers from the moment she arrived in southern Sudan. But no one was prepared for her decision to marry a local warlord—a man who seemed to embody everything she was working against—and to throw herself into his violent quest to take over southern Sudan’s rebel movement.

With precision and insight, Deborah Scroggins—who met McCune in Sudan—charts the process by which McCune’s romantic delusions led to her descent into the hell of Africa’s longest-running civil war. Emma’s War is at once a disturbing love story and an up-close look at Sudan: a world where international aid fuels armies as well as the starving population, and where the northern-based Islamic government—backed by Osama bin Laden—is locked in a war with the Christian and pagan south over religion, oil, and slaves.

A timely, revelatory account of the nature of relief work, of the men and women who choose to carry it out, and of one woman’s sacrifice to its ideals.
 

About Deborah Scroggins

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Deborah Scroggins has won six national journalism awards for her reporting from Sudan and the Middle East. A former correspondent for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, she has published articles in Granta, The Independent, Playboy, and elsewhere. She lives in Atlanta.
 
Published October 1, 2002 by Pantheon. 408 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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Atlanta-based journalist Scroggins, who has reported from the Sudan, uses the story of Emma McCune, a young woman with fashion-model looks who found something in African culture missing from her own life, as a through-line to follow the neglected history of Africa in the 1980s and ’90s, ravaged b...

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The Guardian

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Emma's War by Deborah Scroggins 220pp, HarperCollins, £17.99 In Graham Greene's The Quiet American , Pyle is the earnest young American who blunders into an alien culture believing a well-meaning heart is enough to sort out the problems.

Mar 08 2003 | Read Full Review of Emma's War: An aid worker, a ...

The Guardian

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Emma's War by Deborah Scroggins HarperCollins £17.99, pp220 Emma McCune was a beautiful young Englishwoman who conceived a romantic passion for Africa, went to the Sudan to be an aid worker and ended up marrying a warlord.

Mar 09 2003 | Read Full Review of Emma's War: An aid worker, a ...

Publishers Weekly

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Through her keen observations and fluid writing, Scroggins shows how, after arriving in the Sudan, McCune came to drop her veneer as an aid worker and become both second wife to a rebel leader and apologist for the atrocities of rebel groups.

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