England, My England by D. H. (David Herbert) Lawrence

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Because of his frank and honest portrayal of human sexuality in the controversial works for which he is best known, e.g. "Lady Chatterley’s Lover" and "Women in Love", D. H. Lawrence was not widely respected in his day. In fact at the time of his death he was considered little more than a pornographer. However E. M. Forester challenged this portrayal calling Lawrence "The greatest imaginative novelist of our generation", and with his extended reflection upon the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization, Lawrence has ultimately secured his position as one of the greatest writers in the English language. "England, My England" is a collection of his short stories written between 1913 and 1921 which exhibits this great literary talent. The stories of this volume, many of which are set against the backdrop of World War I, include the following tales: England, My England; Tickets, Please; The Blind Man; Monkey Nuts; Wintry Peacock; You Touched Me; Samson And Delilah; The Primrose Path; The Horse Dealer's Daughter; and Fanny And Annie.

About D. H. (David Herbert) Lawrence

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D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885. His father was a coal miner and Lawrence grew up in a mining town in England. He always hated the mines, however, and frequently used them in his writing to represent both darkness and industrialism, which he despised because he felt it was scarring the English countryside. Lawrence attended high school and college in Nottingham and, after graduation, became a school teacher in Croyden in 1908. Although his first two novels had been unsuccessful, he turned to writing full time when a serious illness forced him to stop teaching. Lawrence spent much of his adult life abroad in Europe, particularly Italy, where he wrote some of his most significant and most controversial novels, including Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterly's Lover. Lawrence and his wife, Frieda , who had left her first husband and her children to live with him, spent several years touring Europe and also lived in New Mexico for a time. Lawrence had been a frail child, and he suffered much of his life from tuberculosis. Eventually, he retired to a sanitorium in Nice, France. He died in France in 1930, at age 44. In his relatively short life, he produced more than 50 volumes of short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel journals, and letters, in addition to the novels for which he is best known.
Published July 1, 2004 by Digireads.com. 377 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, History, Travel, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense. Non-fiction

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