Epossumondas by Coleen Salley

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Synopsis

Who's Epossumondas? Why, he's his mama's and his auntie's sweet little patootie, that's who. He's also the silliest, most lovable, most muddleheaded possum south of the Mason-Dixon line!
Better choose your words wisely when he's around, 'cause otherwise you never know what you'll get. Epossumondas just might bring you a fist full of crumbs, or a soaking wet puppy, or a scruffy wad of bread--oh, you just wouldn't believe it!
Renowned storyteller Coleen Salley and Caldecott Honor illustrator Janet Stevens team up for this outrageous twist on the Southern story of the noodlehead who takes everything way too literally. (Or is that Epossumondas just pulling his mama's leg?)
 

About Coleen Salley

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COLEEN SALLEY was a professor of children's literature for thirty years and now travels widely as a professional storyteller. The old tale of Epaminondas is her trademark, and her new variation appears in print for the first time as "Epossumondas." A native Southerner, she lives in New Orleans, Louisiana. JANET STEVENS is the author-illustrator of many popular and award-winning books for children, including the Caldecott Honor book "Tops & Bottoms." She used her friend Coleen Salley as a character model in both "Epossumondas" and the ABBY Honor Book "To Market, To Market." Ms. Stevens lives in Boulder, Colorado.
 
Published August 1, 2002 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 40 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction, Political & Social Sciences. Fiction

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His encounters with Alligator, Raccoon, Nutria, and Armadillo will have kids giggling out loud as they foresee what comes next, especially with Mama’s final caution: “Be careful about stepping on those pies.” In “A Storyteller’s Note,” Salley (a professional storyteller) cites the origin and rewo...

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Stevens’s bright and whimsical illustrations, full of detail, feature a necktie-wearing bear (bee-pattern, of course), a rabbit in a carrot-festooned shirt, and the return of Epossumondas in his diaper, sitting on Salley’s lap as she tells this tale about tails.

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Kirkus Reviews

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Each time he hears a scary snarl, hiss or snort, he plays possum and the swamp critters leave him alone because they “don’t eat no dead meat.” When the swamp buzzard snatches him up, though, Epossumondas squirms, and the bird promptly drops him saying, “I never, ever eat no live meat.” When Mama ...

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Kirkus Reviews

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This high-spirited Louisiana version of the traditional folktale, “Sody Sallyraytus,” is great fun to read aloud.

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Publishers Weekly

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In the late Salley's last picture book, the fourth to feature Epossumondas and his Mama, Mama warns the possum to steer clear of the swamp because the dreaded “loup-garou snatches [possums] right up with its big ugly claws!” But Epossumondas follows a butterfly into the eerie swamplands, where a ...

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Publishers Weekly

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The diapered furry hero and his human mother are back to explain Why Epossumondas Has No Hair on His Tail by Colleen Salley, illus.

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Publishers Weekly

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Foolish Jack is cast here as a pampered, over-mothered Louisiana possum in a refreshingly retold version by New Orleans storyteller Salley (Who's That Trippin' over My Bridge?).

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Common Sense Media

When he shared this with his wily friend, Hare, the rabbit came up with a typical trickster idea: Papapossum should climb Bear's persimmon tree, something Hare could not do himself, and throw down half of what he could pick.

Oct 03 2004 | Read Full Review of Epossumondas

BookIdeas.com

But she was out of sody sallyratus ("sody sallyratus" is an old Southern term for baking soda, drawn as the "Tail and Hammer" brand in the book).

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