Essays in Zen Buddhism by D.T. Suzuki

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Included in this volume are Suzuki’s famous study “Enlightenment and Ignorance,” a chapter on “Practical Methods of Zen Instruction,” the essays “On Satori — The Revelation of a New Truth in Zen Buddhism” and “History of Zen Buddhism from Bodhidharma to Hui-NÍng (Yeno),” and his commentary on “The Ten Cow-herding Pictures” which have long been used in Zen to illustrate the stages of spiritual progress.

About D.T. Suzuki

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A student of the Zen master Shaku Soen, who addressed the 1893 World's Parliament of Religions held in Chicago, D. T. Suzuki did more to introduce Zen to Westerners than any other representative of that tradition. Shaku Soen sent the young Suzuki to America in 1897 to help Paul Carus translate the Chinese text the Dao De Jing. Suzuki remained in America for about a decade, working at Carus' Open Court Publishing Company outside Chicago. After Suzuki returned to Japan, he married an American woman, Beatrice Lane, in 1911, and they began publishing an English journal, The Eastern Buddhist, in 1921. During this time in Japan, Suzuki translated into Japanese a number of Swedenborgian texts. He traveled to China in 1934, and he went to London in 1936 to attend the World Congress of Faiths. Suzuki recognized that the West had much to offer the East, but like Swami Vivekananda, he was convinced that the East had much to offer the West in its religion and philosophy. On this basis he was motivated to write about Zen in English. Suzuki wrote about 30 books in English and many more in Japanese. Suzuki's first books in English were a translation of Ashvaghosha's Discourse on the Awakening of Faith in the Mahayana (1900) and Outlines of Mahayana Buddhism (1907). A practitioner of Rinzai Zen Buddhism, Suzuki, in his writings about the ultimate experience of satori and the meditative use of koans, made Zen terms almost household words in the United States. In the early part of the twentieth century, Suzuki devoted himself to the propagation of Zen via his writings. After World War II he became a noted lecturer on Zen at American and European universities. That Suzuki's work was effective can be seen in the fact that Zen was picked up in the 1950s by California beatniks, producing what was termed Beat Zen. From that time on, Americans increasingly began to go to Japan to study Zen, and more Zen masters began to come to the United States to teach. The earliest institutions devoted to the practice of Zen in America were established in San Francisco in 1928, in Los Angeles in 1929, and in New York City in 1931. Zen centers remain an important part of the American urban scene, and several of them have established rural Zen retreat centers. Carl Jung was born in Switzerland on July 26, 1875. He originally set out to study archaeology, but switched to medicine and began practicing psychiatry in Basel after receiving his degree from the University of Basel in 1902. He became one of the most famous of modern psychologists and psychiatrists. Jung first met Sigmund Freud in 1907 when he became his foremost associate and disciple. The break came with the publication of Jung's Psychology of the Unconscious (1912), which did not follow Freud's theories of the libido and the unconscious. Jung eventually rejected Freud's system of psychoanalysis for his own "analytic psychology." This emphasizes present conflicts rather than those from childhood; it also takes into account the conflict arising from what Jung called the "collective unconscious"---evolutionary and cultural factors determining individual development. Jung invented the association word test and contributed the word complex to psychology, and first described the "introvert" and "extrovert" types. His interest in the human psyche, past and present, led him to study mythology, alchemy, oriental religions and philosophies, and traditional peoples. Later he became interested in parapsychology and the occult. He thought that unidentified flying objects (UFOs) might be a psychological projection of modern people's anxieties. He wrote several books including Studies in Word Association, Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Skies, and Psychology and Alchemy. He died on June 6, 1961 after a short illness.
Published December 1, 2007 by Grove Press. 404 pages
Genres: Religion & Spirituality, Law & Philosophy. Non-fiction

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