Exile by Jakob Ejersbo
(Africa Trilogy 1)

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...his short, blunt sentences become wearying. "We spend New Year's Eve at Tanga Yacht Club. Welcome to 1984. It's tedium personified." Unfortunately 1985 and 1986 turn out to be pretty uneventful as well.
-Guardian

Synopsis

For the vagabond pack of ex-pat Europeans, Indian Tanzanians and wealthy Africans at Moshi's International School, it's all about getting high, getting drunk and getting laid. Their parents - drug dealers, mercenaries and farmers gone to seed - are too dead inside to give a damn.

Outwardly free but empty at heart, privileged but out of place, these kids are lost, trapped in a land without hope. They can try to get out, but something will always drag them back - where can you go when you believe in nothing and belong to nowhere?

Exile is the first of three powerful novels about growing up as an ex-pat in Tanzania. Ejersbo's first novel, Nordkraft, the Danish Trainspotting, was a phenomenal bestseller. Ejersbo's trilogy, only published after his death in 2008, has proved to be another cult and critical sensation.

 

About Jakob Ejersbo

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Jakob Ejersbo made his literary breakthough with Nordkraft, a searingly realistic novel that changed the face of Danish literature. From 1974-7 and 1983-4 he lived in Moshi in Tanzania. He died in 2008 and did not live to see the publication of The Africa Trilogy. Mette Petersen's previous translations include My Friend Jesus Christ by Lars Husum.
 
Published October 1, 2011 by Maclehose. 320 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Guardian

Below average
Reviewed by Alfred Hickling on Jan 03 2012

...his short, blunt sentences become wearying. "We spend New Year's Eve at Tanga Yacht Club. Welcome to 1984. It's tedium personified." Unfortunately 1985 and 1986 turn out to be pretty uneventful as well.

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