Exodus by Lars Iyer

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And that's why you will either rush to embrace Exodus...or you will flee from it, weeping for the plight of the contemporary novel as it descends into irrelevance, self-indulgence and madcap ramblings.
-Guardian

Synopsis

A wickedly funny and satisfyingly highbrow black comedy about the collapse of Western academic institutions under the weight of neoliberal economics and crushing, widespread idiocy.

Lars and W., the two preposterous philosophical anti-heroes of Spurious and Dogma—called “Uproarious” by the New York Times Book Review—return and face a political, intellectual, and economic landscape in a state of total ruination.

With philosophy professors being moved to badminton departments and gin in short supply—although not short enough—the two hapless intellectuals embark on a relentless mission. Well, several relentless missions. For one, they must help gear a guerilla philosophy movement—conducted outside the academy, perhaps under bridges—that will save the study of philosophy after the long, miserable decades of intellectual desert known as the early 21st-century.

For another, they must save themselves, perhaps by learning to play badminton after all. Gin isn’t free, you know.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Lars Iyer

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Lars Iyer is a lecturer in philosophy at Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne. He is the author of the novel Spurious, two books on Blanchot (Blanchot's Communism: Art, Philosophy, and the Political and Blanchot's Vigilance: Phenomenology, Literature, and the Ethical) and his blog Spurious.
 
Published January 29, 2013 by Melville House. 306 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Humor & Entertainment. Fiction
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Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Ian Sansom on Feb 27 2013

And that's why you will either rush to embrace Exodus...or you will flee from it, weeping for the plight of the contemporary novel as it descends into irrelevance, self-indulgence and madcap ramblings.

Read Full Review of Exodus | See more reviews from Guardian

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