Extra Innings by Robert Newton Peck

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 2 Critic Reviews



Little Viddy's earliest baseball memory was sitting on a hard plank bench in the heart of a visiting team'sdugout, wedged between her two aging gods, Wash and Cappy.And hearing an ump holler: "Play ball!"

In a devastating explosion, young Tate Stonemason loses his family--and his dream--when their private plane crashes and burns. Only he survives. With a leg destroyed, Tate has no chance to pitch in the majors. No one can ease his anger and grief--except the lady who taught him the game...Great-aunt Vidalia.

Desperate for a way to heal Tate's hurting, Aunt Viddy, now seventy, shares her childhood with him: her purple-bus travels with Ethiopia's Clowns, a Depression-era baseball team of rollicking rascals. The laughter and common love of baseball he shares with Aunt Viddy slowly inspires Tate Bannock Stonemason to mature, conquer tragedy, and realize the true power of family.

Robert Newton Peck presents a humorous and heartwarming story of how yesterday's baseball diamonds help to mend the crushed leg and battered spirit of a young athlete.


About Robert Newton Peck

See more books from this Author
Robert Newton Peck was born in Vermont on February 17, 1928. The son of hardworking rural people, he was raised on a farm and worked as a lumberjack, in a papermill, killing hogs, and as an advertising executive before the publication of his first book in 1973. He also served as a machine-gunner in the U.S. Army 88th Infantry Division between 1945 and 1947. He received a B.A. degree from Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida, in 1953, and studied law at Cornell University. A prolific writer of fiction for young people (Peck has written fifteen books in the last ten years), his work is rooted in the rural tradition of his boyhood. His first book, A Day No Pigs Would Die was named an American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults in 1973. Soup and Me, his next book, was made into an ABC After School Special. Soup on Ice was honored with the Child Study Association of America children's book of the year citation in 1987. This book also received the Michigan Council of Teachers in 1984. Peck's book A Day No Pigs Would Die, has been banned by many libraries and schools because of its passage on pig breeding. Yet, despite the controversy the New York Times reported in 1998 that libraries everywhere are featuring special programs and exhibitions calling attention to the banning of books as a threat to freedom of speech and freedom of the press. Peck directs the annual Writers Conference at Rollins College.
Published March 1, 2001 by HarperCollins Publishers. 192 pages
Genres: Young Adult, Sports & Outdoors, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Extra Innings

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Perhaps not the perfect day, but nevertheless a spanking-fresh one.’ ”—has the effect of bringing out how strong, close, and loving they are, and though the worst of Tate’s dark night passes between chapters, his healing brings the story to a strong close.

| Read Full Review of Extra Innings

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

Worldly Aunt Vidalia is a little too perfect, and Tate's worship of her is so artificially worded it rarely sounds authentic: ""Vidalia, you are so wise, it's eerie,"" says Tate.

| Read Full Review of Extra Innings

Rate this book!

Add Review