Far From Home by Lorelie Brown

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People of color and people with mental illnesses are not often represented in mainstream romance. That both are active parts of this story is a reason to celebrate. A well-written novel, both sexy and romantic, with broad and inclusive representation.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

My name is Rachel. I’m straight . . . I think. I also have a mountain of student loans and a smart mouth. I wasn’t serious when I told Pari Sadashiv I’d marry her. It was only party banter! Except Pari needs a green card, and she’s willing to give me a breather from drowning in debt.

My off-the-cuff idea might not be so terrible. We get along as friends. She’s really romantically cautious, which I find heartbreaking. She deserves someone to laugh with. She’s kind. And calm. And gorgeous. A couple of years with her actually sounds pretty good. If some of Pari’s kindness and calm rubs off on me, that’d be a bonus, because I’m a mess—anorexia is not a pretty word—and my little ways of keeping control of myself, of the world, aren’t working anymore.

And if I slip up, Pari will see my cracks. Then I’ll crack. Which means I gotta get out, quick, before I fall in love with my wife.

 

About Lorelie Brown

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After a semi-nomadic lifestyle throughout California, Lorelie Brown joined the US Army. In South Korea, Lorelie met and fell in love with her husband. Once she became a mother, she left soldiering behind and now explores her love of travel by writing historical romance. Lorelie and her husband have three active sons who are definitely momma's boys. To add to the insanity, even the family dog is male. Writing helps her escape a house full of testosterone. Jazz Baby is her first published title.
 
Published July 30, 2016 by Riptide Publishing. 182 pages
Genres: Romance, Gay & Lesbian, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Kirkus

Good
on Jun 22 2016

People of color and people with mental illnesses are not often represented in mainstream romance. That both are active parts of this story is a reason to celebrate. A well-written novel, both sexy and romantic, with broad and inclusive representation.

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