February by Lisa Moore

70%

10 Critic Reviews

...a novel which takes a moment of catastrophe and focuses not on the moment itself but on all the moments that surround it; that are altered, subtly or dramatically, by it.
-Guardian

Synopsis

February is Lisa Moore’s heart-stopping follow-up to her debut novel, Alligator, winner of the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for the Caribbean and Canadian region. Propelled by a local tragedy, in which an oil rig sinks in a violent storm off the coast of Newfoundland, February follows the life of Helen O’Mara, widowed by the accident, as she continuously spirals from the present day back to that devastating and transformative winter.

After overcoming the hardships of raising four children as a single parent, Helen’s strength and calculated positivity fool everyone into believing that she’s pushed through the paralyzing grief of losing her spouse. But in private, Helen has obsessively maintained a powerful connection to her deceased husband. When Helen’s son unexpectedly returns home with life-changing news, her secret world is irrevocably shaken, and Helen is quickly forced to come to terms with her inability to lay the past to rest.

An unforgettable glimpse into the complex love and cauterizing grief that run through all of our lives, February tenderly investigates how memory knits together the past and present, and pinpoints the very human need to always imagine a future, no matter how fragile.
 

About Lisa Moore

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Lisa Moore is the acclaimed author of two Scotiabank Giller Prize-finalists, Open, a story collection, and the novel Alligator, which also won the Commonwealth Writers' Prize for the Caribbean and Canadian region. Moore lives in St. John's, Newfoundland.
 
Published February 9, 2010 by Grove Press, Black Cat. 321 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for February
All: 10 | Positive: 8 | Negative: 2

Kirkus

Above average
Reviewed by Kirkus Reviews on May 20 2010

Subtle and perceptive, but offering little respite from a sometimes monotonous tone of lyrical earnestness.

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NY Times

Above average
Reviewed by SYLVIA BROWNRIGG on Feb 16 2010

But there are difficulties, in part with the novel’s pacing and in part with Cal himself. Moore is adept at conveying the emptiness that followed the accident, but not what had filled it.

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Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Sarah Crown on Feb 27 2010

...a novel which takes a moment of catastrophe and focuses not on the moment itself but on all the moments that surround it; that are altered, subtly or dramatically, by it.

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Globe and Mail

Good
Reviewed by Caroline Adderson on Jun 26 2009

Moore offers us, elegantly, exultantly, the very consciousness of her characters. In this way, she does more than make us feel for them. She makes us feel what they feel, which is, I think, the point of literature...

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The Independent

Above average
Reviewed by Boyd Tonkin on Feb 19 2010

Lisa Moore's firm grip and fine craft make something special from this novel of disaster and its aftermath.

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The Telegraph

Above average
Reviewed by Gabriel Weston on Jan 25 2010

The author’s handling of time is particularly elegant. Initially, she circles between the book’s earliest date, when Cal dies, and its latest, when Helen hears from her son. As she progresses, though, other episodes nudge in...

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The Bookbag

Above average
on Feb 05 2011

It is a thoughtful, contemplative book about coming to terms with the past and a different future from the one the characters envisaged. The narrative shifts between Helen and John, and also Jane, the pregnant woman.

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The Seattle Times

Above average
Reviewed by Wingate Packard on Apr 17 2010

Moore's gift is in her judicious use of provocative gaps. The incompleteness of the narrative intensifies the vivid scenes and characters, conveying the emotional loss of Helen and her family. Yet this is not a dark novel.

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Express

Above average
Reviewed by Leo Robson on Feb 05 2010

Although Moore does a good job of depicting remembered incidents the novel is best in its intimate rendering of thought and feeling. The characters’ emotions are given the solidity of physical symptoms.

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CBC News

Good

An incredible portrait of grief and the difficulty of moving on, February concerns Helen O'Mara, a woman shattered by the death of her husband, Cal, who was one of the crew members.

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Reader Rating for February
70%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 44 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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