Feed by M.T. Anderson

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Synopsis

For Titus and his friends, it started out like any ordinary trip to the moon - a chance to party during spring break and play with some stupid low-grav at the Ricochet Lounge. But that was before the crazy hacker caused all their feeds to malfunction, sending them to the hospital to lie around with nothing inside their heads for days. And it was before Titus met Violet, a beautiful, brainy teenage girl who has decided to fight the feed and its omnipresent ability to categorize human thoughts and desires. Following in the footsteps of George Orwell, Anthony Burgess, and Kurt Vonnegut Jr., M. T. Anderson has created a not-so-brave new world — and a smart, savage satire that has captivated readers with its view of an imagined future that veers unnervingly close to the here and now.
 

About M.T. Anderson

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M.T. Anderson is the author of The Game of Sunken Places; the National Book Award-winning, Michael L. Printz Honor book The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Volume I: The Pox Party; and the Michael L Printz Honor book The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Volume II: The Kingdom of Waves, as well as Feed and Thirsty. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
 
Published July 17, 2012 by Candlewick Press (MA). 299 pages
Genres: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Young Adult, Literature & Fiction, Children's Books. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Feed

Kirkus Reviews

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Thrown together when their feeds are hacked at a party and they are temporarily disconnected, their very hesitant romance is played out against the backdrop of an utterly hedonistic world of trend and acquisition, a world only momentarily disturbed by the news reports of environmental waste and a...

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The New York Times

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''The Royal Tenenbaums'' was shown as part of this year's New York Film Festival.

Dec 14 2001 | Read Full Review of Feed

Publishers Weekly

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In this chilling novel, Anderson imagines a society dominated by the feed—a next-generation Internet/television hybrid that is directly hardwired into the brain.

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Publishers Weekly

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and, after Titus and his friends develop lesions, banner ads and sit-coms dub the lesions the newest hot trend, causing one friend to commission a fake one and another to outdo her by getting cuts all over her body.

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BC Books

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As I grew up, I had to get used to cordless phones and eventually cellular phones.

Oct 06 2007 | Read Full Review of Feed

BC Books

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Even the technologically savvy are often overwhelmed with the number of feeds they inevitably end up subscribing to and try to read using their feed fetchers or newsreaders.

Oct 06 2007 | Read Full Review of Feed

BC Books

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I was born into a world where the telephone was still wired and had a circular dial to ring up someone.

Oct 06 2007 | Read Full Review of Feed

Examiner

This book deserves high praise for all the amazing imagination Anderson put into characters and plot, but also for the delicate work Anderson did to create a world so clear without forcing the reader to see.

Jun 11 2011 | Read Full Review of Feed

Common Sense Media

But Violet -- a homeschooled girl Titus meets on spring break -- is someone who criticizes the feed and wants to do her own thinking.

Sep 23 2002 | Read Full Review of Feed

SF Signal

To my mind, post-apocalyptic fiction cannot be dystopian fiction, because in a post-apocalyptic story society has been destroyed, and to have a dystopia you have to have a society.

Apr 06 2011 | Read Full Review of Feed

The Daily Fig

The Feed whispers the latest trends and prices as they fall asleep (and if they can’t sleep the Feed will play lullabies from around the world).

Aug 17 2010 | Read Full Review of Feed

HSJ

Titus takes this to offense because he didn’t go to school like Violet did and breaks off contact with Violet as her condition worsens.

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Shelf Awareness

In the not-so-distant future, teenage narrator Titus, like all of his peers, has a “feed,” an Internet/television hybrid that is directly hardwired into his brain, and corporations send constant messages through the information stream.

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Reader Rating for Feed
71%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 460 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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