Fight No More by Lydia Millet
Stories

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The collection is linked through characters that reappear (as relatives, friends, lovers) as the book progresses, showing the ways in which we are living in simultaneous dimensions of pain, betrayal and forgetting. Yet as bleak as their situations may get, there remains a thread of dark humor.
-LA Times

Synopsis

Twelve interlocking stories set in Los Angeles describe a broken family through the homes they inhabit.


In her first story collection since Love in Infant Monkeys, which became a Pulitzer Prize finalist, Lydia Millet explores what it means to be home. Nina, a lonely real-estate broker estranged from her only relative, is at the center of a web of stories connecting fractured communities and families. She moves through the houses of L.A.’s wealthy elite and finds men and women both crass and tender, vicious and desperate. With wit and intellect, Millet offers profound insight into human behavior from the ordinary to the bizarre: strong-minded girls are beset by the helpless, myopic executives are tormented by their employees, and beastly men do beastly things.


Fresh off the critical triumph of Sweet Lamb of Heaven (longlisted for the National Book Award), Millet is pioneering a new kind of satire—compassionate toward its victims and hilariously brutal in its depiction of modern American life.

 

About Lydia Millet

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Lydia Millet is the author of the New York Times Notable Book Ghost Lights and eight other works of fiction. Her short story collection Love in Infant Monkeys was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She lives with her children outside Tucson, Arizona.
 
Published June 12, 2018 by W. W. Norton & Company. 224 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Humor & Entertainment. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Fight No More
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

LA Times

Above average
Reviewed by Leah Mirakhor on Jun 08 2018

The collection is linked through characters that reappear (as relatives, friends, lovers) as the book progresses, showing the ways in which we are living in simultaneous dimensions of pain, betrayal and forgetting. Yet as bleak as their situations may get, there remains a thread of dark humor.

Read Full Review of Fight No More: Stories | See more reviews from LA Times

NPR

Good
Reviewed by Lily Meyer on Jun 16 2018

Even by her own high standard, Millet is exceptional in these moments of possibility. She writes them with equal parts wildness and straightforwardness, certainty and the certainty of impermanence.

Read Full Review of Fight No More: Stories | See more reviews from NPR

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