Forbidden Territory and Realms of Strife by Juan Goytisolo
The Memoirs of Juan Goytisolo

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Synopsis

For forty-five years, the expatriate Juan Goytisolo has been widely acknowledged as both Spain’s greatest living writer and its most scabrous critic. In some thirty books of fiction, autobiography, essays and journalism, he has turned the Spanish language against what he derides as ‘Sunnyspain’, flaying the ‘Hispanos’ while excavating their culture’s Moorish and Jewish roots.

This, his masterful two-volume autobiography first published in the mid-1980s, broke new ground in Spanish letters with its introspective sexual and emotional honesty. It charts the writer’s unique journey from a Barcelona childhood violently disrupted by the Spanish civil war to student rebellion against the Francoist dictatorship and exile as a ‘self-banished Spaniard’ to Paris in 1956.

In Paris, Goytisolo fell in love with Monique Lange, befriended Jean Genet, and discovered his own homosexuality as he supported the struggles for Algerian independence. His passionate, iconoclastic pen spares no one, least of all himself, in this striking portrayal of politics and sexuality in twentieth-century France and Spain.
 

About Juan Goytisolo

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Goytisolo first became known in the United States for his novel The Young Assassins (1954), the story of juvenile delinquents corrupted by social conditions during and immediately after the Spanish civil war. His depictions of the spiritual emptiness and moral decay of Spain under the Franco regime led to the censorship of some of his works there, and he moved to Paris in 1957. In 1966 he published Marks of Identity, which would eventually form a trilogy with Count Julian (1970) and Juan the Landless (1975). Count Julian is an exile's view of Spain, with Spanish history, literature, and language derisively viewed for the purpose of destroying them so that they might be reinvented. Formally, it is a "new novel" along the lines of Robbe-Grillet's formulations. Makbara (1980), a misogynous novel, also attacks capitalism. Landscapes after the Battle (1982), based loosely on the life of Lewis Carroll is, in fact, a self-conscious novel concerned mainly with the problems involved in writing novels.
 
Published July 17, 2003 by Verso. 320 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

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